Pre-Effective Amendment No. 1 to Form S-1
Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

As Filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 14, 2016

Registration No. 333-213367

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

PRE-EFFECTIVE

AMENDMENT NO. 1

To

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE

SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

CAPSTAR FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Tennessee   6022   81-1527911

State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

201 4th Avenue North, Suite 950

Nashville, Tennessee 37219

(615) 732-6400

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

Claire W. Tucker

President and Chief Executive Officer

CapStar Financial Holdings, Inc.

201 4th Avenue North, Suite 950

Nashville, Tennessee 37219

(615) 732-6400

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

Copies to:

 

J. Chase Cole

Wes Scott

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP

Nashville City Center

511 Union Street, Suite 2700

Nashville, TN 37219

(615) 244-6380

 

Frank M. Conner III

Michael P. Reed

Covington & Burling LLP

One City Center

850 Tenth Street, NW

Washington, DC 20001

(202) 662-6000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.  ¨

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨      Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   x     (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Calculation of Registration Fee

 

 

Title of each class of

securities to be registered

 

Proposed maximum

aggregate offering

price (1)(2)

 

Amount of

registration fee

Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share

  $46,077,625   $4,650(3)

 

 

(1) Includes shares of common stock to be sold by the selling shareholders and shares of common stock that may be purchased by the underwriters pursuant to their option to purchase additional shares in the offering.
(2) Estimated solely for the purposes of calculating the registration fee in accordance with Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. This amount represents the proposed maximum aggregate offering price of the securities registered hereunder to be sold by the Registrant and the selling shareholders specified herein.
(3) The Registrant previously paid $4,633 of the total registration fee in connection with the filing of Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed on August 29, 2016.

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED SEPTEMBER 14, 2016

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

 

 

2,585,000 Shares

 

 

LOGO

Common Stock

 

 

This prospectus relates to the initial public offering of CapStar Financial Holdings, Inc. We are offering 1,294,787 shares of our common stock. The selling shareholders identified in this prospectus are offering an additional 1,290,213 shares of our common stock. We will not receive any proceeds from sales by the selling shareholders.

Prior to this offering, there has been no established public market for our common stock. We currently estimate the public offering price per share of our common stock will be between $14.50 and $16.50. We have applied to list our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “CSTR.”

We are an “emerging growth company” under the federal securities laws and may take advantage of reduced public company reporting and relief from certain other requirements otherwise generally applicable to public companies. See “Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company.”

 

 

Investing in our common stock involves risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18.

 

 

 

     Per Share        Total  

Initial public offering price

    $           $                

Underwriting discount(1)

       

Proceeds, before expenses, to us

       

Proceeds, before expenses, to selling shareholders

       
(1) The underwriters will also be reimbursed for certain expenses incurred in this offering. See “Underwriting” for details.

We have granted the underwriters an option to purchase up to an additional 387,750 shares of our common stock at the initial public offering price less the underwriting discount, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.

The underwriters expect to deliver the shares of our common stock against payment in New York, New York, on or about                 , 2016.

The shares of our common stock that you purchase in this offering are not deposits, savings accounts or other obligations of our bank subsidiary and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other governmental agency.

 

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any other regulatory body has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

Keefe, Bruyette & Woods

A Stifel Company

      Sandler O’Neill + Partners, L.P.
Raymond James       Stephens Inc.

The date of this prospectus is                     , 2016


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

About This Prospectus

     ii   

Industry and Market Data

     iii   

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

     iii   

Prospectus Summary

     1   

The Offering

     11   

Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data

     13   

Risk Factors

     18   

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

     42   

Use of Proceeds

     44   

Dividend Policy

     45   

Dilution

     46   

Capitalization

     48   

Price Range of Our Common Stock

     49   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     50   

Business

     78   

Supervision and Regulation

     93   

Management

     106   

Executive Compensation and Other Matters

     115   

Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions

     121   

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

     124   

Description of Capital Stock

     129   

Shares Eligible for Future Sale

     136   

Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences for Non-U.S. Holders of Common Stock

     138   

Underwriting

     142   

Legal Matters

     147   

Experts

     147   

Where You Can Find More Information

     147   

Index to Financial Statements

     F-1   

 

i


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

In this prospectus, unless we state otherwise or the context otherwise requires, (i) references to “we,” “our,” “us,” “the Company” and “CapStar” refer to CapStar Financial Holdings, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, CapStar Bank, which we sometimes refer to as “CapStar Bank,” “the bank” or “our bank,” (ii) references to “American Security” refer to American Security Bank & Trust Company, (iii) references to “Farmington” refer to Farmington Financial Group, LLC and (iv) references to the “Nashville MSA” refer to the Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee Metropolitan Statistical Area which includes Davidson County (Nashville) and 13 additional counties.

On July 31, 2012, our bank completed its acquisition of American Security. The selected historical consolidated financial data as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012 includes information regarding the financial position, results of operations and cash flows attributable to American Security for the portion of the year beginning on July 31, 2012, and the selected historical consolidated financial data for all subsequent periods includes information regarding the financial position, results of operations and cash flows attributable to American Security for such periods. Consequently, our financial data for the periods following the year ended December 31, 2011 are not fully comparable to the financial data as of and for the year ended December 31, 2011.

On February 3, 2014, our bank completed its acquisition of Farmington. The consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2014 include the financial position, results of operations and cash flows attributable to Farmington for the portion of the year beginning on February 3, 2014, and the consolidated financial statements for all subsequent periods include the financial position, results of operations and cash flows attributable to Farmington for such periods. Consequently, our results for the periods following the year ended December 31, 2013 are not fully comparable to the financial statements as of and for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011.

On February 5, 2016, we entered into a share exchange with the shareholders of the bank pursuant to which (i) we acquired all of the bank’s issued and outstanding shares of common stock and preferred stock, (ii) assumed shares of restricted stock, options and warrants that were previously issued by the bank and (iii) the bank became our wholly owned subsidiary.

This prospectus describes the specific details regarding this offering and the terms and conditions of our common stock being offered hereby and the risks of investing in our common stock. For additional information, please see the section entitled “Where You Can Find More Information.”

The information contained in this prospectus or any free writing prospectus is accurate only as of its date, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of our common stock. Our assets, business, cash flows, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects or results of operations may have changed since that date.

You should not interpret the contents of this prospectus or any free writing prospectus to be legal, business, investment or tax advice. You should consult with your own advisors for that type of advice and consult with them about the legal, tax, business, financial and other issues that you should consider before investing in our common stock.

We, the selling shareholders and the underwriters have not authorized anyone to provide any information to you other than that contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us

 

ii


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

or to which we have referred you. We, the selling shareholders and the underwriters take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you.

No action is being taken in any jurisdiction outside the United States to permit a public offering of our securities or possession or distribution of this prospectus in that jurisdiction. Persons who come into possession of this prospectus in jurisdictions outside the United States are required to inform themselves about, and to observe, any restrictions as to the offering and the distribution of this prospectus applicable to those jurisdictions. We, the selling shareholders and the underwriters are not making an offer of these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted.

“CapStar Bank” and its logos and other trademarks referred to and included in this prospectus belong to us. Solely for convenience, we refer to our trademarks in this prospectus without the ® or the ™ or symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights to our trademarks. Other service marks, trademarks and trade names referred to in this prospectus, if any, are the property of their respective owners, although for presentational convenience we may not use the ® or the ™ symbols to identify such trademarks.

INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

Market data used in this prospectus has been obtained from government and independent industry sources and publications available to the public, sometimes with a subscription fee, as well as from research reports prepared for other purposes. Industry publications and surveys and forecasts generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. We did not commission the preparation of any of the sources or publications referred to in this prospectus. We have not independently verified the data obtained from these sources, and, although we believe such data to be reliable as of the dates presented, it could prove to be inaccurate. Forward-looking information obtained from these sources is subject to the same qualifications and the additional uncertainties regarding the other forward-looking statements in this prospectus.

IMPLICATIONS OF BEING AN EMERGING GROWTH COMPANY

As a company with less than $1.0 billion in revenue during our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. An emerging growth company may take advantage of reduced reporting requirements and is relieved of certain other significant requirements that are otherwise generally applicable to public companies. As an emerging growth company:

 

    we are permitted to present only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related discussion in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations;

 

    we are exempt from the requirement to obtain an attestation from our auditors on management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act;

 

    we are permitted to provide less extensive disclosure about our executive compensation arrangements; and

 

    we are not required to hold non-binding shareholder advisory votes on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements.

We may take advantage of some or all of these provisions for up to five years unless we earlier cease to be an emerging growth company, which will occur if we have more than $1.0 billion in annual gross revenue, if we issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt in a three-year period, or if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of any June 30 before that time, in which case we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the following December 31. We have taken advantage of certain

 

iii


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

reduced reporting obligations in this prospectus. Accordingly, the information contained herein may be different than the information you receive from other public companies in which you hold stock.

In addition to scaled disclosure and the other relief described above, the JOBS Act permits us an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards affecting public companies. However, we have elected not to take advantage of this extended transition period, which means that the financial statements included in this prospectus, as well as any financial statements that we file in the future, will be subject to all new or revised accounting standards generally applicable to public companies. Our election not to take advantage of the extended transition period is irrevocable.

 

iv


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider before deciding to purchase our common stock in this offering. You should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the sections titled “Risk Factors,” “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto, before making an investment decision.

Our Company

We are CapStar Financial Holdings, Inc., a bank holding company headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee, and we operate primarily through our wholly owned subsidiary, CapStar Bank, a Tennessee-chartered state bank. We are a commercial bank that seeks to establish and maintain comprehensive relationships with our clients by delivering customized and creative banking solutions and superior client service. Our products and services include (i) commercial and industrial loans to small and medium sized businesses, with a particular focus on businesses operating in the healthcare industry, (ii) commercial real estate loans, (iii) private banking and wealth management services for the owners and operators of our business clients and other high net worth individuals and (iv) correspondent banking services to meet the needs of Tennessee’s smaller community banks. Our operations are presently concentrated in demographically attractive and fast-growing counties in the Nashville MSA. As of June 30, 2016, on a consolidated basis, we had total assets of $1.3 billion, total deposits of $1.1 billion, total net loans of $877.0 million, and shareholders’ equity of $114.3 million.

Our Core Operating Principles

Our goal is to become a high-performing financial institution. In striving to achieve this goal, we operate the Company in conformity with our core principles which are, in order of priority:

 

    Soundness. We strive to engage in safe and sound banking practices that preserve the asset quality of our balance sheet and protect our deposit base.

 

    Profitability. We continuously seek to improve our core profitability by growing our revenue faster than our expenses in order to increase net income.

 

    Strategic Growth. We seek to grow our total loans and deposits by leveraging our operating platform to facilitate organic and acquisitive growth.

We have achieved our historical growth through our sustained adherence to these core operating principles, and we believe we have an experienced management team that will continue to emphasize the importance of these principles in order to realize our future growth objectives and enhance long-term shareholder value.

Our Growth

Historical Growth. We have experienced operating success, profitability and significant growth primarily due to:

 

    our management team which has extensive industry knowledge, banking experience, established and long-term relationships with small to medium sized business leaders through middle Tennessee, and product expertise;

 

    our experienced bankers who have expertise in our lines of business, including commercial and industrial, healthcare and commercial real estate, and who focus on providing superior client service;

 



 

1


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    our core commitment to maintaining strong asset quality rather than simply growing the balance sheet;

 

    our funding approach which emphasizes attracting core deposits rather than utilizing a wholesale funding strategy;

 

    our acquisition of American Security Bank & Trust Company, or American Security, which expanded our geographic reach within the Nashville MSA, enhanced our deposit gathering ability and provided scale to leverage our infrastructure; and

 

    our acquisition of Farmington Financial Group, LLC, or Farmington, which expanded our product offerings and increased our fee income by allowing us to offer residential mortgage origination services to our clients.

From December 31, 2011 to June 30, 2016, we grew our total assets at a compound annual growth rate, or CAGR, of 14.5%, our total deposits at a CAGR of 14.5% and our total loans at a CAGR of 19.1%. In addition, from December 31, 2011 to December 31, 2015, we grew our net income at a CAGR of 38.2%.

Future Growth. We believe that we have an operating platform and infrastructure that is capable of supporting a larger financial institution. We believe we can leverage our platform to continue to deliver customized and creative solutions and superior client service to our clients and sustainable, long-term returns to our shareholders. We intend to achieve future growth through the following:

 

    Organic Growth. Our primary focus is to grow our client base, capture market share and leverage our platform within the Nashville MSA, an economically vibrant and demographically attractive market. Within the Nashville MSA, we believe we have competitive advantages over smaller community banks, which lack our product expertise and breadth of service, and larger regional institutions, which lack our knowledge of the Nashville MSA and responsive, local decision-making. Because of consolidation that has occurred in the banking industry within the Nashville MSA, we also believe that there is a base of potential clients that desire to partner with a bank that is locally headquartered and there are seasoned bankers that we believe we can hire who prefer the local, independent, banking franchise to that of the more diversified, regional financial institution. To capitalize on these opportunities, we intend to (i) leverage the relationships and contacts of our bankers to identify and target these businesses and individuals and (ii) develop comprehensive banking relationships with these businesses and individuals by delivering customized and creative banking solutions comparable to that of a larger regional institution while providing the superior client service expected of a smaller community bank.

 

    Strategic Acquisitions. Although our primary focus is on organic growth, we continually review potential acquisitions that would enable us to leverage our platform. We seek acquisition targets that are strategic, that are financially attractive and that support our organic growth strategy without compromising our risk profile. We believe that there are numerous banking institutions that lack our scale and management expertise and that may encounter capital constraints or liquidity challenges. We expect any future acquisition targets will be financial institutions that are complementary to our operations and that are located in the Nashville MSA or other economically vibrant and demographically attractive markets. We believe that having publicly traded equity as a result of this offering will enhance our ability to capitalize on such acquisition opportunities in the future. Currently we are not engaged in the acquisition of any target company, and we do not currently have any agreements, arrangements or understandings for any such acquisition.

 

    Expansion of Fee Income and Deposit Sources. We intend to continue to diversify our revenue sources by growing our wealth management and mortgage banking lines of business, which generate fee income. We expect that our increased participation in correspondent banking and private banking will provide additional deposits to our bank, thus diversifying our deposit portfolio, while also creating sources of fee income. In addition, we will seek to grow core deposits by cross-selling our products and services to our existing clients and by obtaining new clients.

 



 

2


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Our Leadership

We are led by a team of banking professionals, each of whom has extensive experience with large regional banking institutions, as well as maintaining well-established relationships with the small to medium sized business leaders in the Nashville MSA.

 

    Our executive management team is led by President and Chief Executive Officer Claire W. Tucker, a banker with a career that spans over 41 years, leading large geographical areas and business segments for regional and national banks. Ms. Tucker has been with CapStar Bank since August 2007. She previously served as Senior Executive Vice President in charge of commercial banking for AmSouth Bancorporation, or AmSouth. In 2011, Ms. Tucker was appointed by the Federal Reserve Bank for the Sixth District to a three-year term (and has since been reappointed to a second three-year term) for the Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council. Ms. Tucker began her banking career in 1975 at First American National Bank and rose to serve as President of Corporate Banking. First American National Bank was a financial institution with approximately $20.0 billion in assets that was based in Nashville and served the States of Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana. First American National Bank was the largest bank in the Nashville MSA and ranked first by deposit market share when acquired in 1999.

 

    Robert B. Anderson is Chief Financial Officer and Chief Administrative Officer of CapStar and CapStar Bank. Mr. Anderson has more than two decades of leadership experience in the financial sector and has been with CapStar Bank since December 2012. Mr. Anderson has held multiple finance roles with Bank of America, including serving as Chief Financial Officer of the business banking segment. He also served as Chief Financial Officer for Capital One’s commercial bank. Mr. Anderson is a certified public accountant (inactive).

 

    Dandridge W. Hogan is Chief Executive Officer of CapStar Bank. Mr. Hogan is a 30-year banking veteran and has been with CapStar Bank since December 2012. Mr. Hogan was previously the Regional President for Fifth Third Bank and had responsibility for banking operations in the States of Kentucky and Tennessee and led its expansion into the State of Georgia. He is a past member of the board of directors of the Nashville Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Mr. Hogan began his career at National Bank of Commerce, which was a $25.0 billion financial institution based in Memphis, Tennessee with various locations throughout the Southeast region of the United States.

 

    Christopher G. Tietz is Chief Credit Officer of CapStar Bank. Mr. Tietz has over 31 years of banking experience and has been with CapStar Bank since March 2016. He started as a trainee of First American National Bank in Nashville in 1985 and rose to the position of Executive Vice President and Regional Senior Credit Officer for First American’s West Tennessee Region, including oversight of credit functions for private banking, business banking, middle-market, and corporate banking functions. Subsequent to his positions at First American, Mr. Tietz held various Chief Credit Officer roles at banks in the Midwest region of the United States and then most recently at FSG Bank in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

In addition to our experienced executive management team, our board of directors is comprised of well-regarded career bankers, professionals, entrepreneurs and business and community leaders with collective depth and experience in commercial banking, finance, real estate and manufacturing. Of our eleven directors, eight have served previously on the boards of directors of banking institutions, and six have held positions at commercial or investment banking institutions. Collectively, this group of directors has in excess of 150 years of collective financial services. Dennis C. Bottorff is the Chairman of the board of directors of the Company and CapStar Bank. Mr. Bottorff’s banking experience spans nearly five decades, and he has held senior leadership roles at numerous banks, including as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of First American National Corporation and First American National Bank and Chairman of AmSouth and AmSouth Bank. During his career, Mr. Bottorff also served in leadership positions with the Tennessee and American Banking Associations and the Financial Services Roundtable.

 



 

3


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We have also attracted, developed and retained bankers with significant in-market experience and relationships in order to support our organic growth strategy. These efforts have gained us significant expertise in client relations, while providing viable internal candidates for eventual management succession at various levels throughout our Company.

Our Market

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Nashville MSA is currently the 36th largest MSA in the United States. The Nashville region is expected to surpass the current size of the Austin, Charlotte and Portland regions by 2035, reaching a population of approximately 2.6 million. The following table illustrates the growth profile of the Nashville MSA as compared to the State of Tennessee, the Southeast region of the United States and the entire United States.

SUMMARY DEMOGRAPHIC AND OTHER MARKET DATA

 

Geographic Area

  Total
Population

2016
(Actual)
    Population
Change

2010 - 2016
    Projected
Population
Change

2016 - 2021
    Median
Household

Income
2016
    Projected
Household

Income
Change

2016 - 2021
    Unemployment
Rate*
 

Nashville MSA**

    1,840,320        10.14     6.87   $ 55,922        9.41     4.0

State of Tennessee

    6,623,654        4.37     3.82     46,781        7.13     4.1

Southeast Region of the United States

    82,419,986        5.43     4.43     52,942        6.13     4.7

United States

    322,431,073        4.43     3.69     55,551        7.77     5.1

 

* Unemployment data as of June 2016
** The Nashville MSA includes Davidson County (Nashville) and 13 additional counties.

Source: SNL Financial, Bureau of Labor Statistics

 



 

4


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

A recent Forbes report ranked the Nashville MSA at fourth on its list of “The Best Big Cities for Jobs 2016,” compiled based on short-, mid- and long-term job growth trends, ahead of such regions as Dallas, Austin, Denver and Charlotte. In April 2016, Nashville reported the second lowest unemployment rate among metropolitan areas with a population of at least one million, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Since June 2011, Nashville has had the third strongest recovery in jobs among the 50 largest markets in the country, with a 19.3% increase in jobs since their lowest point in September 2009, according to a study published by the Pew Charitable Trusts. According to data compiled by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, since July 2015, more than 100 companies have announced plans to relocate to, or expand within, Nashville and the surrounding area, generating an estimated 11,000 new jobs. We believe that the Nashville MSA is a desirable market for a wide range of industries, and the following table shows the diversity of employment within the Nashville MSA.

NASHVILLE MSA EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

 

LOGO

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data as of May 2, 2016.

We believe that the economic vibrancy and attractive demographics of the Nashville MSA provide a favorable operating environment in which we can execute our growth strategy.

 



 

5


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Our Competitive Strengths

Profitable and Scalable Operating Platform and Organizational Infrastructure. Over the past five years, we have delivered core profitability, which we view as return on average assets and pre-tax, pre-provision return on average assets. We continuously strive to improve our core profitability by growing our revenue faster than our noninterest expenses, a process we internally refer to as enhancing “operating leverage.” The following graphs depict our return on average assets and pre-tax, pre-provision return on average assets over the last five years.

 

RETURN ON AVERAGE ASSETS  

PRE-TAX, PRE-PROVISION

RETURN ON AVERAGE ASSETS

 

LOGO   LOGO

We believe that we have an efficient and scalable operating platform and organizational infrastructure that will allow us to continue to improve our operating leverage. Key attributes of our banking model include:

 

    an executive management team that is poised to lead a public company;

 

    an appropriate number of bankers and other personnel that we believe are capable of supporting our growth strategy;

 

    an ability to grow our noninterest income faster than our net interest income, in part by scaling our wealth management, mortgage, treasury management, and other fee related services;

 

    an ability to lower our deposit cost, which we measure through demand deposit accounts (our fastest growing type of deposit account), as we become the primary bank for more of our clients;

 

    highly-sophisticated operating systems that allow us to manage our assets in the same manner as much larger institutions;

 

    qualified external data processing and technology providers that allow us to remain current with innovation and market practices in key areas; and

 

    online and mobile banking technologies and amenities that allow us to grow deposits without expanding our physical footprint.

We believe that our platform will enable us to (i) operate efficiently and profitably, (ii) scale our business as we continue to grow and expand and (iii) add experienced bankers in the future with minimal additional expenses other than salaries and benefits.

 



 

6


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Sophisticated Lending Focus. The primary components of our loan portfolio are commercial and industrial loans to small and medium sized businesses, with a particular focus on businesses operating in the healthcare industry, and commercial real estate loans. We believe that our success is in part dependent on our extensive knowledge of these markets, which we believe are positively affecting much of the economic growth in the Nashville MSA. We have banking teams dedicated to the healthcare industry and each of the commercial and industrial and commercial real estate lending areas. We believe our industry-specific knowledge, product expertise and client engagement increase our profile within these lending verticals, enabling us to successfully identify, select and compete for credit-worthy borrowers and attractive financing projects. The following chart details the composition of our loan portfolio as of June 30, 2016.

LOAN PORTFOLIO COMPOSITION

 

LOGO

 

(1) Loans made to businesses operating in the healthcare line of business comprised 42% of all commercial and industrial loans.
(2) Loans made to community banks operating in the correspondent banking line of business comprised 8% of commercial and industrial loans.

Strong Asset Quality. We maintain a firm commitment to preserving the asset quality of our balance sheet. Reflective of our credit culture is a question we routinely ask ourselves in the underwriting process: “Is this loan merely doable or is it actually prudent and desirable?” We believe our strong asset quality is also due to our experience in the Nashville MSA, our long-standing relationships with our clients and our disciplined underwriting processes. Our thorough underwriting processes collaboratively engage our seasoned business bankers, credit underwriters and portfolio managers in the analysis of each loan request. We manage our credit risks by analyzing metrics related to our lines of business in order to maintain a conservative and well-diversified loan portfolio reflective of our assessment of various industry subsets. Based upon our aggregate exposure to any given borrower relationship, we employ scaled review of loan originations that may involve senior credit officers, our Chief Credit Officer, our bank’s Credit Committee or, ultimately, our full board of directors. The following table compares our asset quality metrics to certain Tennessee regional and community banks.

 



 

7


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

ASSET QUALITY—NON-PERFORMING ASSETS

 

     Non-Performing Assets as a
Percentage of Assets
    Non-Performing Assets as a Percentage
of Loans Plus Other Real Estate Owned
 

  Median

     1.30     2.00

  1st Quartile

     0.62        0.94   

CapStar

     0.44        0.66   

Percentile Rank

     82.2        83.6   

Source: SNL Financial (includes 147 banks and thrifts headquartered in Tennessee with total assets less than $5.0 billion as of June 30, 2016; excludes merger targets).

Solid and Growing Core Deposit Base. A significant component of our business is the growth and stability of our core deposits, which we use to fund our loans and securities. Our private banking and correspondent banking lines of business are significant sources of core deposits, and we believe that the growth of our core deposit base, specifically our Demand and NOW accounts, is a result of our focus on developing comprehensive banking relationships with our clients. As an example, we have increased our Demand and NOW accounts from approximately 13% of total deposits as of December 31, 2011 to approximately 44% of total deposits as of June 30, 2016. This growth has resulted in a lower overall cost of funding and has enhanced our profitability. Our plan is to continue to grow our core deposits by cross-selling deposit relationships and obtaining new clients. The following charts show the improvement in our deposit composition as of June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

 

DEPOSIT COMPOSITION AS OF
JUNE 30, 2016

 

  

DEPOSIT COMPOSITION AS OF
DECEMBER 31, 2011

 

LOGO    LOGO

Technology and Innovation. We have continually adapted to the changing technological needs and wants of our clients by investing in our electronic banking platform. We use a combination of online and mobile banking channels to attract and retain clients and expand the convenience of banking with us. In most cases, our clients can initiate banking transactions from the convenience of their personal computer or smart phone, reducing the number of in-branch visits necessary to conduct routine banking transactions. The remote transactions available to our clients include remote image deposit, bill payment, external and internal transfers, ACH origination and wire transfer. We believe that our investments in technology and innovation are consistent with our clients’ needs and will support future migration of our clients’ transactions to these and other developing electronic banking channels.

 



 

8


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Our Challenges

Our ability to become a high-performing financial institution, to realize our future growth objectives and to enhance long-term shareholder value is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties that are discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors.” These risks and uncertainties include the following:

 

    the adverse effects of weak economic conditions on our business and operations;

 

    the concentration of our business in the Nashville MSA and the effect of changes in the economic, political and environmental conditions on this market;

 

    the competition that we experience from financial institutions and other financial service providers;

 

    our dependence upon our management team and board of directors and changes in our management and board composition;

 

    our ability to execute our growth plans and our ability to manage any future growth effectively;

 

    our ability to maintain a positive reputation and build a strong brand in the Nashville MSA;

 

    our targeting of small and medium-sized businesses, the credit risks related to the size of these borrowers and our ability to adequately assess and limit such risk;

 

    our concentration of large loans to a limited number of borrowers; and

 

    the lack of seasoning in our loan portfolio.

Our Recent Accolades

 

    CapStar honored by the Nashville Business Journal with a “Best in Business” award, 2016

 

    CapStar recognized as 8th in “25 Fastest Growing Private Companies” (Nashville Business Journal, 2015)

 

    Claire Tucker named “EY Entrepreneur of the Year in Financial Services for the Southeast Region” (Ernst and Young, 2014)

 

    CapStar has made the list of “Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies” (Inc., 5000, 2014)

Our History and Corporate Information

CapStar Bank was incorporated in the State of Tennessee in 2007.

The bank successfully completed its initial and only capital issuance in 2008, raising approximately $88.0 million in shareholders’ equity, which represented and continues to be the largest initial capitalization in Tennessee history for a de novo state-chartered bank. During the economic recession and bank liquidity crisis that soon followed, the bank did not accept government funds from the Troubled Asset Relief Program or the Small Business Lending Fund, nor did it need to supplement its capital base to maintain well-capitalized status by issuing any form of additional capital.

The bank acquired a state charter in 2008 which was accomplished through a de novo application with the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions, or the TDFI, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Upon approval of its charter, CapStar Bank opened for business to the public on July 14, 2008. Since then, the bank has opened two additional branches in the Nashville MSA. In July 2012, the bank completed the acquisition of American Security which, at the date of acquisition, operated two branch locations and approximately $160 million in assets. In February 2014, the bank completed the acquisition of Farmington.

 



 

9


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We were incorporated on December 1, 2015, and, on February 5, 2016, we completed the share exchange with CapStar Bank’s shareholders that resulted in CapStar Bank becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. As a result of the share exchange, all of our operations are currently conducted through CapStar Bank.

We currently have seven locations, five of which are retail bank branches and two of which are mortgage origination offices.

Our principal executive offices are located at 201 4th Avenue North, Suite 950, Nashville, Tennessee 37219, and our telephone number is (615) 732-6400. We also maintain an Internet site at www.capstarbank.com. Our website and the information contained therein or limited thereto is not incorporated into this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part. We have 166 highly engaged employees as of June 30, 2016, who continue to drive consistent growth across all lines of business.

 



 

10


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

THE OFFERING

 

Common stock offered by us

   1,294,787 shares

Common stock offered by selling shareholders

   1,290,213 shares

Underwriter purchase option

   387,750 shares of common stock from us

Shares of common stock outstanding after completion of the offering

  

10,795,870 shares of common stock, assuming the underwriters do not exercise their purchase option.(1)

Use of proceeds

   Assuming an initial public offering price of $15.50 per share, which is the midpoint of the offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, we estimate that the net proceeds to us from the sale of our common stock in this offering will be $17.1 million, (or $22.7 million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of common stock from us), after deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses. We intend to use the net proceeds to us from this offering, along with available cash, for general corporate purposes, which may include the support of our balance sheet growth, the acquisition of other banks or financial institutions or other complementary businesses to the extent such opportunities arise, and the maintenance of our capital and liquidity ratios, and the ratios of our bank, at acceptable levels. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling shareholders. For additional information, see “Use of Proceeds.

Dividends

   Holders of our common stock are only entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by our board of directors out of funds legally available for dividends. We have not paid any cash dividends on our capital stock since inception, and we do not intend to pay dividends for the foreseeable future. Our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders in the future will depend on regulatory restrictions, liquidity and capital requirements, our earnings and financial condition, the general economic climate, contractual restrictions, our ability to service any equity or debt obligations senior to our
   common stock and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. For additional information, see “Dividend Policy.”

 



 

11


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

NASDAQ Global Select Market listing

   We have applied to list our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “CSTR.”

Directed share program

   The underwriters have reserved for sale at the initial public offering price up to 5% of the shares of our common stock being offered by this prospectus for sale to certain of our employees, executive officers, directors, business associates and related persons who have expressed an interest in purchasing our common stock in this offering. We do not know if these persons will choose to purchase all or any portion of the reserved shares, but any purchases they do make will reduce the number of shares available to the general public. See “Underwriting.”

Registration rights

   Certain of our shareholders have demand and piggyback registration rights. For a detailed description, see “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Related Party Transactions—Registration Rights.”

Risk factors

   Investing in our common stock involves risks. See “Risk Factors” for a discussion of certain factors that you should carefully consider before making an investment decision.

 

(1) References in this section to the number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering are based on 8,684,699 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding as of September 13, 2016. Unless otherwise noted, these references exclude the following as of September 13, 2016:

 

    878,049 shares of common stock issuable upon the conversion of Series A Preferred Stock that is not included in this offering, but include 731,707 shares of common stock that will be issued upon the conversion of Series A Preferred Stock by one of our selling shareholders and offered for sale as part of this offering;

 

    1,029,125 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options at a weighted average exercise price of $10.52 per share;

 

    547,319 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants at a weighted average exercise price of $10.16 per share, but include 84,677 shares of common stock that will be issued upon the exercise of outstanding warrants at an exercise price of $15.50 per share, which is the midpoint of the offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, by one of our selling shareholders and offered for sale as part of this offering; and

 

    183,636 shares of common stock reserved for issuance pursuant to awards granted under the CapStar Financial Holdings, Inc. Stock Incentive Plan, or the Stock Incentive Plan.

Except as otherwise indicated, all information in this prospectus:

 

    assumes an initial public offering of $15.50 per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus; and

 

    assumes no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase 387,750 additional shares of our common stock from us.

 



 

12


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

You should read the following selected historical consolidated financial data in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes and the sections entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Capitalization” included elsewhere in this prospectus. The following tables set forth selected historical consolidated financial data (i) as of and for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 and (ii) as of and for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2011. Selected financial data as of and for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 and for the year ended December 31, 2013 have been derived from our audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We have derived the selected financial data as of the year ended December 31, 2013, and as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012 from our audited financial statements not included in this prospectus. We have derived the selected financial data as of and for the year ended December 31, 2011 from our audited financial statements and other financial information (which reflects all adjustments necessary to present fairly in all material respects our financial condition and results of operations for such period in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP) not included in this prospectus. Selected financial data as of and for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and for the six months ended June 30, 2015 have been derived from our unaudited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus and have not been audited but, in the opinion of our management, contain all adjustments (consisting of only normal or recurring adjustments) necessary to present fairly in all material respects our financial position and results of operations for such periods in accordance with GAAP. Selected financial data as of June 30, 2015 have been derived from financial information that has not been audited but, in the opinion of our management, contain all adjustments (consisting of only normal or recurring adjustments) necessary to present fairly in all material respects our financial condition as of such period in accordance with GAAP. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of any future period. The performance ratios, asset quality and capital ratios, mortgage metrics and real estate concentrations are unaudited and derived from our audited and unaudited financial statements and other financial information as of and for the periods presented. Average balances have been calculated using daily averages.

 

    Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands,

except per share information)

  2016     2015     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Statement Of Income Data:

             

Interest income

  $ 21,513      $ 19,430      $ 40,504      $ 38,287      $ 41,157      $ 33,966      $ 23,454   

Interest expense

    3,355        2,911        5,731        5,871        6,576        6,682        7,146   

Net interest income

    18,158        16,519        34,773        32,416        34,581        27,284        16,308   

Provision for loan and lease losses

    1,120        721        1,651        3,869        938        3,968        1,897   

Noninterest income

    4,939        4,331        8,884        7,419        1,946        1,935        874   

Noninterest expense

    15,961        15,050        30,977        28,562        25,432        19,021        13,211   

Income before income taxes

    6,016        5,079        11,029        7,404        10,157        6,230        2,073   

Income tax expense

    1,956        1,649        3,470        2,412        3,749        (3,168       

Net income

    4,060        3,430        7,559        4,992        6,408        9,398        2,073   

Pre-tax pre-provision net income (1)

    7,136        5,800        12,680        11,273        11,095        10,197        3,970   

Balance Sheet Data (At Period End):

             

Cash and due from banks

  $ 97,546      $ 45,328      $ 100,185      $ 73,934      $ 44,793      $ 113,282      $ 44,043   

Investment securities

    220,186        285,168        221,891        285,514        305,291        280,115        236,837   

Loans held for sale

    57,014        50,919        35,729        15,386                        

Gross loans and leases (net of unearned income)

    887,437        725,341        808,396        713,077        626,382        624,328        430,329   

Total intangibles

    6,317        6,371        6,344        6,398        284        317          

Total assets

    1,310,418        1,148,615        1,206,800        1,128,395        1,009,485        1,031,755        711,183   

Deposits

    1,143,301        967,735        1,038,460        981,057        879,165        919,782        621,212   

Borrowings and repurchase agreements

    40,000        66,263        48,755        34,837        29,494        7,452        12,622   

Total liabilities

    1,196,100        1,042,765        1,098,214        1,025,744        913,294        931,277        636,613   

Common equity

    97,818        89,350        92,086        86,151        79,691        83,977        58,070   

Preferred equity

    16,500        16,500        16,500        16,500        16,500        16,500        16,500   

Total shareholders’ equity

    114,318        105,850        108,586        102,651        96,191        100,478        74,570   

Tangible equity (1)

    108,001        99,479        102,242        96,253        95,907        100,160        74,570   

 



 

13


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands,

except per share information)

  2016     2015     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Selected Performance Ratios:

             

Return on average assets (ROAA)

    0.67     0.60     0.66     0.47     0.62     1.11     0.34

Pre-tax pre-provision return on average assets (PTPP ROAA) (1)

    1.18     1.02     1.11     1.06     1.08     1.20     0.65

Return on average equity (ROAE)

    7.31     6.59     7.08     4.94     6.46     10.56     2.94

Return on average tangible equity (ROATE) (1)

    7.75     7.02     7.53     5.30     6.48     10.70     2.94

Net interest margin

    3.13     3.04     3.19     3.20     3.45     3.30     2.73

Efficiency ratio (2)

    69.1     72.2     71.0     71.7     69.6     65.1     76.9

Noninterest income / average assets

    0.82     0.76     0.78     0.70     0.19     0.23     0.14

Noninterest expense / average assets

    2.64     2.65     2.72     2.68     2.47     2.25     2.16

Loan and lease yield

    4.31     4.43     4.53     4.74     5.48     5.50     5.02

Deposit cost

    0.60     0.57     0.56     0.62     0.71     0.89     1.34

Per Share Outstanding Data:

             

Basic net earnings per share

  $ 0.47      $ 0.40      $ 0.89      $ 0.59      $ 0.75      $ 1.20      $ 0.29   

Diluted net earnings per share

    0.38        0.33        0.73        0.49        0.62        1.00        0.24   

Shares of common stock outstanding at end of period

    8,683,902        8,533,418        8,577,051        8,471,516        8,353,087        8,705,283        7,142,783   

Adjusted shares outstanding at end of period (1)

    10,293,658        10,143,174        10,186,807        10,081,272        9,962,843        10,315,039        8,752,539   

Book value per share, reported

    11.26        10.47        10.74        10.17        9.54        9.65        8.13   

Tangible book value per share, reported (1)

    10.54        9.72        10.00        9.41        9.51        9.61        8.13   

Book value per share, adjusted (1)

    11.11        10.44        10.66        10.18        9.65        9.74        8.52   

Tangible book value per share, adjusted (1)

    10.49        9.81        10.04        9.55        9.63        9.71        8.52   

Non-Performing Assets:

             

Non-performing loans

  $ 5,829      $ 3,390      $ 2,689      $ 7,738      $ 6,552      $ 8,784      $ 141   

Troubled debt restructurings

           91        125        2,618                      141   

Other real estate and repossessed assets

           335        216        575        1,451        1,822          

Non-performing assets

    5,829        3,726        2,905        8,313        8,003        10,606        141   

Asset Quality Ratios:

             

Non-performing assets / assets

    0.44     0.32     0.24     0.74     0.79     1.03     0.02

Non-performing loans / loans

    0.66     0.47     0.33     1.09     1.05     1.41     0.03

Non-performing assets / loans + OREO

    0.66     0.51     0.36     1.16     1.27     1.69     0.03

Net charge-offs to average loans (periods annualized)

    0.19     0.86     0.38     0.15     0.11     0.40     0.14

Allowance for loan and lease losses to total loans and leases

    1.18     1.23     1.25     1.58     1.35     1.32     1.45

Allowance for loan and lease losses to non-performing loans

    179.32     263.67     376.8     145.8     129.1     93.5     4,415.6

Capital Ratios (At Period End):

             

Tier 1 leverage ratio

    8.90     8.84     9.33     8.56     8.96     9.22     10.31

Common equity tier 1 capital (CET1)

    8.34     8.72     8.89                            

Tier 1 risk-based capital

    9.73     10.28     10.41     10.32     11.14     11.77     13.47

Total risk-based capital ratio

    10.67     11.21     11.42     11.54     12.19     12.86     14.68

Total shareholders’ equity to total asset ratio

    8.72     9.22     9.00     9.10     9.54     9.74     10.49

Tangible equity to tangible assets (1)

    8.28     8.71     8.52     8.58     9.51     9.71     10.49

Real Estate—Commercial And Construction Concentrations:

             

Construction and development loans

  $ 63,744      $ 41,094      $ 52,522      $ 46,193      $ 30,217      $ 35,674      $ 24,676   

Commercial real estate and construction loans

    239,866        167,737        198,285        172,803        146,258        150,253        109,988   

Construction and development to total risk-based capital

    52.7     37.3     45.3     42.8     30.1     36.7     32.3

Commercial real estate and construction to total risk-based capital

    198.4     152.3 %      170.9     160.0     145.8     154.6     144.0

 

 



 

14


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands,

except per share information)

  2016     2015     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Composition Of Loans Held For Investment:

             

Commercial real estate—owner occupied

  $ 104,345      $ 89,916      $ 108,132      $ 93,096      $ 71,968      $ 70,754      $ 56,189   

Commercial real estate—non-owner occupied

    171,426        126,719        143,065        126,697        110,053        106,393        76,417   

Consumer real estate

    91,091        86,875        93,785        77,688        61,545        74,073        54,505   

Construction and land development

    63,744        41,094        52,522        46,193        30,217        35,674        24,676   

Commercial and industrial

    389,088        342,533        353,442        333,613        319,899        297,281        184,747   

Consumer

    7,486        8,473        8,668        7,911        7,939        10,749        12,687   

Other

    61,669        31,157        50,197        29,393        26,007        30,333        22,120   

Deposit Composition:

             

Demand

  $ 193,542      $ 170,820      $ 190,580      $ 157,355      $ 135,448      $ 102,786      $ 66,641   

NOW

    314,325        116,922        189,983        115,915        84,028        60,663        12,655   

Money market and savings

    440,900        464,253        437,214        484,600        427,312        544,762        404,775   

Time deposits less than $100,000

    44,859        47,473        45,902        51,813        46,819        52,844        21,563   

Time deposits greater than or equal to $100,000

    149,675        168,267        174,781        171,373        185,482        158,778        115,578   

Mortgage Metrics: (3)

             

Total origination volume

  $ 236,915      $ 224,641      $ 422,323      $ 253,099                        

Total mortgage loans sold

    215,809        192,058        407,941        245,891                        

Purchase volume as a % of originations

    69     66     72     76                     

Gain on sale of loans

    3,002        2,950        5,962        4,067                        

Gain on sale as a % of loans sold

    1.39     1.54     1.46     1.65                     

Gain on sale as a % of total revenue

    13.0     14.2 %       13.7     10.2                     

 

(1) This measure is not recognized under GAAP and is therefore considered to be a non-GAAP measure. See “—GAAP Reconciliation and Management Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures” for a reconciliation of this measure to its most comparable GAAP measure.
(2) Efficiency ratio is noninterest expense divided by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income.
(3) Data shown for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 represents activity since closing the acquisition of Farmington in February 2014.

GAAP Reconciliation and Management Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

Some of the financial measures included in our selected historical consolidated financial and other data are not measures of financial performance recognized by GAAP. Our management uses the non-GAAP financial measures set forth below in its analysis of our performance.

 

    “Pre-tax pre-provision net income” is pre-tax income plus the provision for loan and lease losses.

 

    “Tangible equity” is total shareholders’ equity less intangible assets.

 

    “Pre-tax pre-provision return on average assets” is “pre-tax pre-provision net income divided by average assets.

 

    “Average tangible equity” is total average shareholders’ equity less average intangible assets.

 

    “Return on average tangible equity,” or ROATE, is defined as net income available to shareholders divided by average tangible equity.

 

    “Adjusted shares outstanding at end of period” is total shares of common stock outstanding at end of period plus total shares of preferred stock outstanding at end of period.

 



 

15


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    “Book value per share, adjusted” is total shareholders’ equity divided by total shares of common and preferred stock outstanding.

 

    “Tangible assets” is total assets less intangible assets.

 

    “Tangible common equity” is common equity less total intangibles.

 

    “Tangible book value per share, reported” is tangible common equity divided by total shares of common stock outstanding.

 

    “Tangible book value per share, adjusted” is tangible equity divided by total shares of common and preferred stock outstanding.

 

    “Tangible equity to tangible assets” is tangible equity divided by tangible assets.

We believe that these non-GAAP financial measures provide useful information to management and investors that is supplementary to our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows computed in accordance with GAAP; however, we acknowledge that our non-GAAP financial measures have a number of limitations. As such, you should not view these disclosures as a substitute for results determined in accordance with GAAP, and they are not necessarily comparable to non-GAAP financial measures that other companies use. The following reconciliation table provides a more detailed analysis of these non-GAAP financial measures:

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands,

except per share information)

   2016     2015     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Pre-Tax Pre-Provision Net Income:

              

Pre-tax income

   $ 6,016      $ 5,079      $ 11,029      $ 7,404      $ 10,157      $ 6,230      $ 2,073   

Add: provision for loan and lease losses

     1,120        721        1,651        3,869        938        3,968        1,897   

Pre-tax pre-provision net income

     7,136        5,800        12,680        11,273        11,095        10,198        3,970   

Tangible Equity:

              

Total shareholders’ equity

   $ 114,318      $ 105,850      $ 108,586      $ 102,651      $ 96,191      $ 100,477      $ 74,570   

Less: intangible assets

     6,317        6,371        6,344        6,398        284        317          

Tangible equity

     108,001        99,479        102,242        96,253        95,907        100,160        74,570   

Pre-Tax Pre-Provision Return on Average Assets:

              

Total average assets

   $ 1,214,252      $ 1,144,416      $ 1,140,760      $ 1,064,705      $ 1,028,709      $ 846,901      $ 612,775   

Pre-tax pre-provision net income

     7,136        5,800        12,680        11,273        11,095        10,197        3,970   

Pre-tax pre-provision return on average assets

     1.18     1.02     1.11     1.06     1.08     1.20     0.65

Return on Average Tangible Equity (ROATE):

              

Total average shareholders’ equity

   $ 111,695      $ 104,968      $ 106,727      $ 101,030      $ 99,153      $ 88,990      $ 70,625   

Less: average intangible assets

     6,331        6,385        6,371        6,855        301        1,151          

Average tangible equity

     105,364        98,583        100,356        94,175        98,852        87,839        70,625   

Net income to shareholders

     4,060        3,430        7,559        4,992        6,408        9,397        2,073   

Return on average tangible equity (ROATE)

     7.75     7.02 %       7.53     5.30     6.48     10.70     2.94

 



 

16


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands,

except per share information)

   2016     2015     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Adjusted Shares Outstanding at End of Period:

              

Shares of common stock outstanding

     8,683,902        8,533,418        8,577,051        8,471,516        8,353,087        8,705,283        7,142,783   

Shares of preferred stock outstanding

     1,609,756        1,609,756        1,609,756        1,609,756        1,609,756        1,609,756        1,609,756   

Adjusted shares outstanding at end of period

     10,293,658        10,143,174        10,186,807        10,081,272        9,962,843        10,315,039        8,752,539   

Book Value per Share, Adjusted:

              

Total shareholders’ equity

   $ 114,318      $ 105,850      $ 108,586      $ 102,651      $ 96,191      $ 100,478      $ 74,570   

Adjusted shares outstanding at end of period

     10,293,658        10,143,174        10,186,807        10,081,272        9,962,843        10,315,039        8,752,539   

Book value per share, adjusted

   $ 11.11      $ 10.44      $ 10.66      $ 10.18      $ 9.65      $ 9.74      $ 8.52   

Tangible Common Equity:

              

Common equity

     97,818        89,350        92,086        86,151        79,691        83,977        58,070   

Less: intangible assets

     6,317        6,371        6,344        6,398        284        317          

Tangible common equity

     91,501        82,979        85,742        79,753        79,407        83,660        58,070   

Tangible Book Value per Share, Reported

              

Tangible common equity

   $ 91,501      $ 82,979        85,742      $ 79,753      $ 79,407      $ 83,660      $ 58,070   

Shares of common stock outstanding

     8,683,902        8,533,418        8,577,051        8,577,051        8,353,087        8,705,283        7,142,783   

Tangible book value per share reported

   $ 10.54      $ 9.72      $ 10.00      $ 9.41      $ 9.51      $ 9.61      $ 8.13   

Tangible Book Value per Share, Adjusted:

              

Tangible equity

   $ 108,001      $ 99,479      $ 102,242      $ 96,253      $ 95,907      $ 100,160      $ 74,570   

Adjusted shares outstanding at end of period

     10,293,658        10,143,174        10,186,807        10,081,272        9,962,843        10,315,039        8,752,539   

Tangible book value per share, adjusted

   $ 10.49      $ 9.81      $ 10.04      $ 9.55      $ 9.63      $ 9.71      $ 8.52   

Tangible Equity to Tangible Assets:

              

Tangible equity

   $ 108,001      $ 99,479      $ 102,242      $ 96,253      $ 95,907      $ 100,160      $ 74,570   

Total assets

     1,310,418        1,148,615        1,206,800        1,128,395        1,008,709        1,031,755        711,183   

Less: intangible assets

     6,317        6,371        6,344        6,398        284        317          

Tangible assets

     1,304,101        1,142,244        1,200,456        1,121,997        1,008,425        1,031,437        711,183   

Tangible equity to tangible assets

     8.28     8.71     8.52     8.58     9.51     9.71     10.49

 



 

17


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a significant degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risk factors, in addition to the other information contained in this prospectus, before deciding to invest in our common stock. Any of the following risks, as well as risks that we do not know or currently deem immaterial, could materially and adversely affect our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations. As a result, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment. Further, to the extent that any of the information in this prospectus constitutes forward-looking statements, the risk factors below also are cautionary statements identifying important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf. See “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” beginning on page 42.

Risks Related To Our Business

As a business operating in the financial services industry, our business and operations may be adversely affected in numerous and complex ways by weak economic conditions.

Our business and operations, which primarily consist of lending money to clients in the form of loans, borrowing money from clients in the form of deposits and investing in securities, are sensitive to general business and economic conditions in the United States. If the U.S. economy weakens, our growth and profitability from our lending, deposit and investment operations could be constrained. Uncertainty about the federal fiscal policymaking process, the medium- and long-term fiscal outlook of the federal government, and future tax rates is a concern for businesses, consumers and investors in the United States.

Weak economic conditions are characterized by numerous factors, including deflation, fluctuations in debt and equity capital markets, a lack of liquidity and/or depressed prices in the secondary market for mortgage loans, increased delinquencies on mortgage, consumer and commercial loans, residential and commercial real estate price declines and lower home sales and commercial activity. The current economic environment is also characterized by interest rates at near historically low levels, which impacts our ability to attract deposits and to generate attractive earnings through our loan and investment portfolios. All of these factors can individually or in the aggregate be detrimental to our business, and the interplay between these factors can be complex and unpredictable. Adverse economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

The global financial markets continue to experience significant volatility as a result of, among other things, economic and political instability in the wake of the referendum in the United Kingdom in June 2016, in which the majority of voters voted in favor of an exit from the European Union, or Brexit. Following the vote on Brexit, stock markets worldwide experienced significant declines and certain currency exchange rates fluctuated substantially, and the outlook for the global economy in 2016 and beyond remains uncertain as negotiations commence to determine the future terms of the United Kingdom’s relationship with the European Union. Such global market instability may hinder future U.S. economic growth, which could adversely affect our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our business and operations are concentrated in state of Tennessee generally and the Nashville MSA more specifically, and we are more sensitive than our more geographically diversified competitors to adverse changes in the local economy.

Unlike with many of our larger competitors that maintain significant operations located outside our market area, substantially all of our clients are individuals and businesses located and doing business in the Nashville MSA. As of June 30, 2016, approximately 86% of the loans in our loan portfolio (measured by dollar amount) were made to borrowers who live or conduct business in the Nashville MSA. Therefore, our success will depend

 

18


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

upon the general economic conditions in this area, which we cannot predict with certainty. As a result, our operations and profitability may be more adversely affected by a local economic downturn in the Nashville MSA than those of larger, more geographically diverse competitors. For example, the Nashville economy is particularly sensitive to changes in the healthcare service, music and entertainment and hospitality and tourism industries, among others. A downturn in these industries or in the local economy generally could make it more difficult for our borrowers to repay their loans and may lead to loan losses that are not offset by operations in other markets; it may also reduce the ability of depositors to make or maintain deposits with us. For these reasons, any regional or local economic downturn that affects the state of Tennessee generally and the Nashville MSA specifically, or existing or prospective borrowers or depositors in the Nashville MSA could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

From time to time, our bank may provide financing to clients who or that have companies or properties located outside the Nashville MSA or the state of Tennessee. In such cases, we would face similar local market risk in those communities for these clients.

Competition from financial institutions and other financial service providers may adversely affect our profitability.

The banking business is highly competitive, and we experience competition in our market from many other financial institutions. We compete with commercial banks, credit unions, savings and loan associations, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies, securities brokerage firms, insurance companies, money market funds, and other mutual funds, as well as other community banks and super-regional and national financial institutions that operate offices in our service area. These competitors often have far greater resources than we do and are able to conduct more intensive and broader-based promotional efforts to reach both commercial and individual clients.

We compete with these other financial institutions both in attracting deposits and in making loans. In addition, we must attract our client base from other existing financial institutions and from new residents. We expect competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete with an array of financial institutions in our service area.

Our ability to compete successfully will depend on a number of factors, including, among other things:

 

    our ability to recruit and retain experienced and talented bankers at competitive compensation levels;

 

    our ability to build and maintain long-term client relationships while ensuring high ethical standards and safe and sound banking practices;

 

    the scope, relevance and pricing of products and services that we offer;

 

    client satisfaction with our products and services;

 

    industry and general economic trends; and

 

    our ability to keep pace with technological advances and to invest in new technology.

Increased competition could require us to increase the rates that we pay on deposits or lower the rates that we offer on loans, which could reduce our profitability. We derive a substantial majority of our business from the Nashville MSA. Our failure to compete effectively in our market could restrain our growth or cause us to lose market share, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

19


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We are dependent on the services of our management team and board of directors, and the unexpected loss of key personnel or directors may adversely affect our business and operations.

We are led by an experienced core management team with substantial experience in the markets that we serve, and our operating strategy focuses on providing products and services through long-term relationship managers and ensuring that our largest clients have relationships with our senior management team. Accordingly, our success depends in large part on the performance of these key personnel, as well as on our ability to attract, motivate and retain highly qualified senior and middle management. Competition for employees is intense, and the process of locating key personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to execute our business plan may be lengthy. If any of our executive officers, other key personnel, or directors leaves us or our bank, our operations may be adversely affected. While we have employment agreements containing non-competition provisions with many of our key personnel, if any of such personnel leaves his or her position for any reason, our financial condition and results of operations may suffer because of his or her skills, knowledge of our market, years of industry experience and the difficulty of promptly finding qualified personnel to replace him or her. Additionally, our directors’ community involvement and diverse and extensive local business relationships are important to our success.

Our business strategy includes the continuation of our growth plans, and we could be negatively affected if we fail to grow or fail to manage our growth effectively.

We intend to continue pursuing our growth strategy for our business through organic growth of our loan and deposit portfolio as well as through strategic acquisitions. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties that can be encountered by financial service companies in rapid growth stages, which include the risks associated with the following:

 

    maintaining loan quality;

 

    maintaining adequate management personnel and information systems to oversee such growth;

 

    maintaining adequate control and compliance functions;

 

    obtaining regulatory approvals with respect to acquisitions;

 

    entry into new markets, industries, and product areas; and

 

    securing capital and liquidity needed to support anticipated growth.

We may not be able to expand our presence in our existing market or new markets. Our ability to grow successfully will depend on a variety of factors, including the continued availability of desirable business opportunities, the competitive responses from other financial institutions in our market areas and our ability to manage our growth. Failure to manage our growth effectively could adversely affect our ability to successfully implement our business strategy, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

As a bank that focuses on building comprehensive banking relationships with clients, our reputation is critical to our business, and damage to it could have a material adverse effect on us.

A key differentiating factor for our business is the strong brand we are building in the Nashville MSA market. Through our branding, we communicate to the market about our company and our service offerings. Maintaining a positive reputation is critical to our attracting and retaining clients and employees. Adverse perceptions of us could make it more difficult for us to execute on our strategy. Harm to our reputation can arise from many sources, including actual or perceived employee misconduct, misconduct by our outsourced service providers or other counterparties, litigation or regulatory actions, our failure to meet our standards of service and quality and compliance failures. Negative publicity regarding us or our bank, whether or not accurate, may damage our reputation, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

20


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We target small and medium sized businesses as loan clients, who may have greater credit risk than larger borrowers.

We target small and medium sized businesses as loan clients. As of June 30, 2016, $790.3 million, or 90%, of our $877.0 million of total net loans were made to small and medium sized businesses. Because of their size, these borrowers may be less able to withstand competitive, economic or financial pressures than larger borrowers in periods of economic weakness. If loan losses occur at a level where the allowance for loan and lease losses is not sufficient to cover actual loan losses, our earnings will decrease.

Our concentration of large loans to a limited number of borrowers may increase our credit risk.

Our growth over the last several years has been partially attributable to our ability to originate and retain large loans. In addition to regulatory limits to which our bank is subject, we have established an internal policy limiting loans to one borrower, principal or guarantor based on “total exposure,” which represents the aggregate exposure of economically related borrowers for approval purposes; loans in excess of our internal limit require acknowledgment by our bank’s full board of directors. Many of these loans have been made to a small number of borrowers, resulting in a concentration of large loans to certain borrowers. As of June 30, 2016, our 10 largest borrowing relationships accounted for approximately 13% of our total loan portfolio. Along with other risks inherent in these loans, such as the deterioration of the underlying businesses or property securing these loans, this high concentration of borrowers presents a risk to our lending operations. If any one of these borrowers becomes unable to repay its loan obligations as a result of economic or market conditions, or personal circumstances, such as divorce or death, our non-accrual loans and our allowance for loan and lease losses could increase significantly, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Lack of seasoning of our loan portfolio could increase risk of credit defaults in the future.

As a result of our growth over the past several years, as of June 30, 2016, approximately $526 million of the loans in our loan portfolio, or 59% of our loan portfolio, had been originated since June 30, 2014, including new originations and renewals. In general, loans do not begin to show signs of credit deterioration or default until they have been outstanding for some period of time, a process referred to as “seasoning.” As a result, a portfolio of older loans will usually behave more predictably than a newer portfolio. Because a large portion of our portfolio is relatively new, the current level of delinquencies and defaults may not represent the level of delinquencies and defaults that could occur as the portfolio becomes more seasoned and may not serve as a reliable basis for predicting the health and nature of our loan portfolio. Our limited experience with these loans does not provide us with a significant payment history pattern with which to judge future collectability. As a result, it may be difficult to predict the future performance of our loan portfolio. If delinquencies and defaults increase, we may be required to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We may not be able to adequately assess and limit our credit risk, which could adversely affect our profitability.

A primary component of our business involves making loans to clients. The business of lending is inherently risky because the principal of or interest on the loan may not be repaid timely or at all or the value of any collateral supporting the loan may be insufficient to cover our outstanding exposure. These risks may be affected by the strength of the borrower’s business sector and local, regional and national market and economic conditions. Our risk management practices, such as monitoring our loan applicants and the concentration of our loans within specific lines of business and our credit approval practices, may not adequately assess credit risk, and our credit administration personnel, policies and procedures may not adequately adapt to changes in economic or any other conditions affecting clients and the quality of the loan portfolio. A failure to effectively assess and limit the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

21


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Our allowance for loan and lease losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb losses inherent in our loan portfolio.

We maintain an allowance for loan and lease losses that represents management’s best estimate of the loan and lease losses and risks inherent in our loan portfolio. The level of the allowance reflects management’s continuing evaluation of concentrations within our lines of business, specific credit risks, loan loss experience, current loan portfolio quality, present economic, political and regulatory conditions and unidentified losses inherent in the current loan portfolio. The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for loan and lease losses is highly subjective and requires us to make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. Inaccurate management assumptions, continuing deterioration of economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding existing loans, identification of additional problem loans and other factors, both within and outside of our control, may require us to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses. In addition, our regulators, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review our loan portfolio and the adequacy of our allowance for loan and lease losses and may require adjustments based upon judgments that are different than those of management. Further, if actual charge-offs in future periods exceed the amounts allocated to the allowance for loan and lease losses, we may need to increase our provision for loan and lease losses to restore the adequacy of our allowance for such losses. If we are required to materially increase our level of allowance for loan and lease losses for any reason, our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

The healthcare service industry is an integral component of the local economy, and adverse trends in the healthcare service industry could have a material adverse effect on us.

The healthcare service industry is an integral segment of the local economy, having a local impact of approximately $38.8 billion and more than 250,000 jobs in the Nashville MSA according to data from the Nashville Healthcare Council as of June 2015. As of June 30, 2016, approximately 18% of our loan portfolio was composed of loans to borrowers in the healthcare service industry. Adverse trends in the healthcare service industry may have a negative impact on a significant portion of the Company’s borrowers and clients. The healthcare service industry may be affected by the following:

 

    trends in the method of delivery of healthcare services;

 

    competition among healthcare providers;

 

    consolidation of large health insurers;

 

    lower reimbursement rates from government and commercial payors, high uncompensated care expense, investment losses and limited admissions growth pressuring operating profit margins for healthcare providers;

 

    availability of capital;

 

    credit downgrades;

 

    liability insurance expense;

 

    regulatory and government reimbursement uncertainty resulting from changes to laws governing the delivery of healthcare services and reimbursement of providers of healthcare services;

 

    congressional efforts to repeal and federal court cases challenging the legality of certain aspects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010;

 

    health reform initiatives to address healthcare costs through expanded value-based purchasing programs, bundled provider payments, health insurance exchanges, increased patient cost-sharing, geographic payment variations, comparative effectiveness research, lower payments for hospital readmissions, and shared risk-and-reward payment models such as accountable care organizations;

 

22


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    federal and state government plans to reduce budget deficits and address debt ceiling limits by lowering healthcare provider Medicare and Medicaid payment rates, while requiring increased patient access to care;

 

    equalizing Medicare payment rates across different facility-type settings;

 

    heightened health information technology security standards and the meaningful use of electronic health records by healthcare providers; and

 

    potential tax law changes affecting healthcare providers.

These changes, among others, could adversely affect the economic performance of some or all of our borrowers and clients in the healthcare services industry and, in turn, have a materially negative impact on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our commercial real estate loan portfolio exposes us to credit risks that may be greater than the risks related to other types of loans.

Our loan portfolio includes non-owner-occupied commercial real estate loans, or CRE loans, to individuals and businesses for various purposes, which are secured by commercial properties, as well as construction and land development loans. CRE loans typically involve repayment dependent upon income generated, or expected to be generated, by the property securing the loan in amounts sufficient to cover operating expenses and debt service. The availability of such income for repayment may be adversely affected by changes in the economy or local market conditions. These loans expose us to greater credit risk than loans secured by other types of collateral because the collateral securing these loans is typically more difficult to liquidate. Additionally, non-owner-occupied CRE loans generally involve relatively large balances to single borrowers or related groups of borrowers. Unexpected deterioration in the credit quality of our non-owner-occupied CRE loan portfolio could require us to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, which would reduce our profitability and could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

A prolonged downturn in the real estate market could result in losses and adversely affect our profitability.

As of June 30, 2016, approximately 31% of our loan portfolio was composed of commercial real estate loans, 10% consumer real estate loans, and 7% construction and land development loans. The real estate collateral in each case provides an alternate source of repayment in the event of default by the borrower and may deteriorate in value during the time the credit is extended. A decline in real estate values could further impair the value of our collateral and our ability to sell the collateral upon any foreclosure, which would likely require us to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses. In the event of a default with respect to any of these loans, the amounts we receive upon sale of the collateral may be insufficient to recover the outstanding principal and interest on the loan. If we are required to re-value the collateral securing a loan to satisfy the debt during a period of reduced real estate values or to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, our profitability could be adversely affected, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Regulatory requirements affecting our loans secured by commercial real estate could limit our ability to leverage our capital and adversely affect our growth and profitability.

The federal bank regulatory agencies have indicated their view that banks with high concentrations of loans secured by commercial real estate are subject to increased risk and should implement robust risk management policies and maintain higher capital than regulatory minimums to maintain an appropriate cushion against loss that is commensurate with the perceived risk. Federal bank regulatory guidelines identify institutions potentially

 

23


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

exposed to CRE concentration risk as those that have (i) experienced rapid growth in CRE lending, (ii) notable exposure to a specific type of CRE, (iii) total reported loans for construction, land development and other land loans representing 100% or more of the institution’s capital, or (iv) total CRE loans representing 300% or more of the institution’s capital if the outstanding balance of the institution’s CRE loan portfolio has increased 50% or more during the prior 36 months. Because a significant portion of our loan portfolio is dependent on commercial real estate, a change in the regulatory capital requirements applicable to us or a decline in our regulatory capital could limit our ability to leverage our capital as a result of these policies, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We engage in lending secured by real estate and may be forced to foreclose on the collateral and own the underlying real estate, subjecting us to the costs and potential risks associated with the ownership of the real property.

Since we originate loans secured by real estate, we may have to foreclose on the collateral property to protect our investment and may thereafter own and operate such property, in which case we would be exposed to the risks inherent in the ownership of real estate. As of June 30, 2016, we did not have any other real estate owned. The amount that we, as a mortgagee, may realize after a default is dependent upon factors outside of our control, including, but not limited to:

 

    general or local economic conditions;

 

    environmental cleanup liability;

 

    neighborhood assessments;

 

    interest rates;

 

    real estate tax rates;

 

    operating expenses of the mortgaged properties;

 

    supply of and demand for rental units or properties;

 

    ability to obtain and maintain adequate occupancy of the properties;

 

    zoning laws;

 

    governmental and regulatory rules;

 

    fiscal policies; and

 

    natural disasters.

Our inability to manage the amount of costs or size of the risks associated with the ownership of real estate, or write-downs in the value of other real estate owned, could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We have several large depositor relationships, the loss of which could force us to fund our business through more expensive and less stable sources.

As of June 30, 2016, our 10 largest non-brokered depositors accounted for $274.8 million in deposits, or approximately 24% of our total deposits. Further, our non-brokered deposit account balance was $967.6 million, or approximately 85% of our total deposits, as of June 30, 2016.

Withdrawals of deposits by any one of our largest depositors could force us to rely more heavily on borrowings and other sources of funding for our business and withdrawal demands, adversely affecting our net interest margin and results of operations. We may also be forced, as a result of any withdrawal of deposits, to

 

24


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

rely more heavily on other, potentially more expensive and less stable funding sources. Consequently, the occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Correspondent banking introduces unique risks, which could affect our liquidity.

Our correspondent banking line of business comprised over $202.4 million of deposits as of June 30, 2016. Although correspondent banking provides diversification of our funding base, it introduces a unique set of risks. Increases in the federal funds rate could create liquidity issues within the bank as it competes with the interest on reserves rate paid by the Federal Reserve Bank. Additionally, strong industry-wide loan demand could also create liquidity issues as excess balances held at CapStar Bank by our correspondent banks would presumably be redeployed by those banks into new loans. Further, capital inadequacy or asset quality issues at other institutions could result in increased risk to us due to the potential for large deposit withdrawals. If any of the foregoing were to occur, our liquidity could be materially and adversely affected.

Liquidity risk could impair our ability to fund operations and meet our obligations as they become due, and our funding sources may be insufficient to fund our future growth.

Liquidity is essential to our business. Liquidity risk is the potential that we will be unable to meet our obligations as they come due because of an inability to liquidate assets or obtain adequate funding. An inability to raise funds, at competitive rates or at all, through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity. In particular, approximately 83% of our bank’s deposits as of June 30, 2016 were checking accounts and other liquid deposits, which are payable on demand or upon several days’ notice, while by comparison, 68% of the assets of our bank were loans at June 30, 2016, which cannot be called or sold in the same time frame. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance our activities or on terms that are acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry or economy in general.

Factors that could negatively impact our access to liquidity sources include a decrease of our business activity as a result of a downturn in the markets in which our loans are concentrated, adverse regulatory action against us, or our inability to attract and retain deposits. Market conditions or other events could also negatively affect the level or cost of funding, affecting our ongoing ability to accommodate liability maturities and deposit withdrawals, meet contractual obligations and fund asset growth and new business transactions at a reasonable cost, in a timely manner and without adverse consequences. For example, we rely on deposits, federal funds purchased and advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati, or FHLB, to fund our operations. As of June 30, 2016, we had $40 million of advances from the FHLB outstanding. Although we have historically been able to replace maturing deposits and advances if desired, we may not be able to replace such funds in the future if, among other things, our financial condition, the financial condition of the FHLB or market conditions were to change. In such a circumstance, we may seek additional borrowings to achieve our long-term business objectives; however, they may not be available to us on favorable terms or at all.

Additionally, whole loan sale agreements may require us to repurchase or substitute mortgage loans, or indemnify buyers against losses, in the event we breach representations or warranties to purchasers, guarantors and insurers, including government-sponsored entities, about the mortgage loans and the manner in which they were originated. In addition, we may be required to repurchase mortgage loans as a result of early payment default of the borrower on a mortgage loan. If repurchase and indemnity demands increase and such demands are valid claims and are in excess of our provision for potential losses, our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

Any substantial, unexpected or prolonged change in the level or cost of liquidity could have a material adverse effect on our ability to meet deposit withdrawals and other client needs, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

25


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We are subject to interest rate risk, which could adversely affect our profitability, and we do not have a history of operating in a rising interest rate environment.

Our profitability, like that of most financial institutions, depends to a large extent on our net interest income, which is the difference between our interest income on interest-earning assets, such as loans and investment securities, and our interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings. We have positioned our asset portfolio to benefit in a higher interest rate environment, but this may not remain true in the future. We have managed the growth of our bank since inception in an economic environment characterized by historically low interest rates. Our ability to continue that performance in a rising rate environment is not a certainty. Our interest sensitivity profile was asset sensitive as of June 30, 2016, meaning that our net interest income would increase more from rising interest rates than from falling interest rates. However, because we do not have a history of operating in a rising interest rate environment, we have no historical data on which to model the actual effect of rising interest rates on our assets and liabilities. As a result, these models may not be an accurate indicator of how our interest income will be affected by changes in interest rates.

Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors that are beyond our control, including general economic conditions and policies of various governmental and regulatory agencies and, in particular, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Changes in monetary policy, including changes in interest rates, could influence not only the interest we receive on loans and securities and the interest we pay on deposits and borrowings but could also affect our ability to originate loans and obtain deposits, the fair value of our financial assets and liabilities, and the average duration of our assets. If the interest rates paid on deposits and other borrowings increase at a faster rate than the interest rates received on loans and other investments, our net interest income, and therefore earnings, could be adversely affected. Earnings could also be adversely affected if the interest rates received on loans and other investments fall more quickly than the interest rates paid on deposits and other borrowings.

In addition, an increase in interest rates could also have a negative impact on our results of operations by reducing the ability of borrowers to repay their current loan obligations. These circumstances could not only result in increased loan defaults, foreclosures and charge-offs, but also necessitate further increases to the allowance for loan and lease losses which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Changes in monetary policy and government responses to adverse economic conditions such as inflation and deflation may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our financial condition and results of operations are affected by credit policies of monetary authorities, particularly the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Actions by monetary and fiscal authorities, including the Federal Reserve, could lead to inflation, deflation, or other economic phenomena that could adversely affect our financial performance. The primary impact of inflation on our operations most likely will be reflected in increased operating costs. Conversely, deflation generally will tend to erode collateral values and diminish loan quality.

Our recent results may not be indicative of our future results and may not provide sufficient guidance to assess the risk of an investment in our common stock.

Our business has grown rapidly. Although rapid business growth can reflect favorable business conditions, financial institutions that grow rapidly can experience significant difficulties as a result of rapid growth. Failure to build infrastructure sufficient to support rapid growth and suffering loan losses in excess of reserves for such losses, as well as other risks associated with rapidly growing financial institutions, could materially impact our operations.

We may not be able to sustain our historical rate of growth and may not be able to expand our business at all. In addition, our recent growth may distort some of our historical financial ratios and statistics. Various factors,

 

26


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

such as economic conditions, regulatory and legislative considerations and competition, may also impede or prohibit our ability to expand our market presence. As a small commercial bank, we have different lending risks than larger banks. We provide services to our local communities; thus, our ability to diversify our economic risks is limited by our own local market and economy. We lend primarily to small and medium sized businesses, which may expose us to greater lending risks than those faced by banks lending to larger, better-capitalized businesses with longer operating histories. We manage our credit exposure through careful monitoring of loan applicants and loan concentrations in particular industries, and through our loan approval and review procedures. Our use of historical and objective information in determining and managing credit exposure may not be accurate in assessing our risk. Our failure to sustain our historical rate of growth or adequately manage the factors that have contributed to our growth could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our bank’s size presents multiple challenges that may restrict our growth and prevent us from effectively implementing our business strategy, such as our regulatory and internal lending limits and our ability to effectively leverage our infrastructure to implement our business strategy.

We are limited in the amount our bank can loan in the aggregate to a single borrower or related borrowers by the amount of the bank’s capital. CapStar Bank is a Tennessee-chartered bank and therefore is subject to the legal lending limits of the state of Tennessee and federal law. Tennessee and federal legal lending limits are safety and soundness measures intended to prevent one person or a relatively small and economically related group of persons from borrowing an unduly large amount of a bank’s funds. They are also intended to safeguard a bank’s depositors by diversifying the risk of loan losses among a relatively large number of credit-worthy borrowers engaged in various types of businesses. Under Tennessee law, total loans and extensions of credit to a borrower generally may not exceed 15% of our bank’s capital, surplus and undivided profits. However, such loans may be in excess of that percentage, but not above 25%, if each loan in excess of 15% is first submitted to and approved in advance in writing by the board of directors and a record is kept of such written approval and reported to the board of directors quarterly. Under federal law applicable to Federal Reserve member banks, total loans and extensions of credit to a borrower may not exceed 15% of our bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus. However, such loans may be in excess of that percentage, but not above 25%, if each loan in excess of 15% is fully collateralized by readily marketable collateral. We have also established an internal limit on loans to one borrower between 7% and 15% of our capital, surplus and undivided profits, depending upon the underlying risk rating. Loans in excess of our internal limit are noted as a policy exception and require acknowledgment by our bank’s full board of directors. Based upon our bank’s current capital levels, the amount it may lend is significantly less than that of many of our larger competitors and may discourage potential borrowers who have credit needs in excess of the bank’s lending limit from doing business with us. Our bank accommodates larger loans by selling participations in those loans to other financial institutions, but this strategy may not always be available. If we are unable to compete effectively for loans from our target clients, we may not be able to effectively implement our business strategy, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our growth strategy may involve strategic acquisitions, and we may not be able to overcome risks associated with such transactions.

We plan to continue to explore opportunities to acquire other financial institutions and businesses in or around our existing Nashville market or in comparable markets or that would involve lines of business that are additive to our existing products and services. Our acquisition activities could be material to our business and involve a number of risks, including the following:

 

    the need to raise new capital;

 

    the time and expense associated with identifying and evaluating potential acquisitions and negotiating potential transactions, resulting in our management’s attention being diverted from the operation of our existing business;

 

27


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    the lack of history among our management team in working together on acquisitions and related integration activities;

 

    the time, expense and difficulty of integrating the operations and personnel of the combined businesses;

 

    an inability to realize expected synergies or returns on investment;

 

    failure to discover the existence of liabilities during the due diligence process;

 

    exposure to unknown or contingent liabilities for which we may not be indemnified;

 

    potential disruption of our ongoing banking business; and

 

    a loss of key employees or key clients following an acquisition.

We may not be successful in overcoming these risks or any other problems encountered in connection with potential acquisitions. Our inability to overcome these risks could have an adverse effect on our ability to implement our business strategy and enhance shareholder value, which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our continued pace of growth may require us to raise additional capital in the future to fund such growth, and the unavailability of additional capital on terms acceptable to us could adversely affect us or our growth.

After giving effect to this offering, we believe that we will have sufficient capital to meet our capital needs for our immediate growth plans. However, we will continue to need capital to support our longer-term growth plans. If capital is not available on favorable terms when we need it, we will have to either issue common stock or other securities on less than desirable terms or reduce our rate of growth until market conditions become more favorable. Either of such events could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

The fair value of our investment securities could fluctuate because of factors outside of our control, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

As of June 30, 2016, the fair value of our investment securities portfolio was approximately $219.5 million. Factors beyond our control could significantly affect the fair value of these securities. These factors include, but are not limited to, rating agency actions in respect of the securities, defaults by the issuer or with respect to the underlying securities, and changes in market interest rates and continued instability in the capital markets. Any of these factors, among others, could cause other-than-temporary impairments, or OTTI, and realized and/or unrealized losses in future periods and declines in earnings and/or other comprehensive income (loss), which could materially and adversely affect our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations. The process for determining whether impairment of a security is OTTI usually requires complex, subjective judgments about the future financial performance and liquidity of the issuer, any collateral underlying the security as well as the Company’s intent and ability to hold the security for a sufficient period of time to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value in order to assess the probability of receiving all contractual principal and interest payments on the security. Our failure to assess any impairments or losses with respect to our securities could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Deterioration in the fiscal position of the U.S. federal government and downgrades in the U.S. Department of the Treasury and federal agency securities could adversely affect us and our banking operations.

The long-term outlook for the fiscal position of the U.S. federal government is uncertain, as illustrated by the 2011 downgrade by certain rating agencies of the credit rating of the U.S. government and federal agencies.

 

28


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

However, in addition to causing economic and financial market disruptions, any future downgrade, failure to raise the U.S. statutory debt limit, or deterioration in the fiscal outlook of the U.S. federal government, could, among other things, materially adversely affect the market value of the U.S. and other government and governmental agency securities that we hold, the availability of those securities as collateral for borrowing, and our ability to access capital markets on favorable terms. In particular, such events could increase interest rates and disrupt payment systems, money markets, and long-term or short-term fixed income markets, adversely affecting the cost and availability of funding, which could negatively affect our profitability. Also, the adverse consequences of any downgrade could extend to those to whom we extend credit and could adversely affect their ability to repay their loans. Any of these developments could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We are subject to losses resulting from fraudulent and negligent acts on the part of loan applicants, our borrowers, other third parties, and our employees.

When we originate loans, we rely heavily upon information supplied by third parties, including the information contained in the loan application, property appraisal, title information and employment and income documentation. If any of this information is intentionally or negligently misrepresented and such misrepresentation is not detected prior to loan funding, the fair value of the loan may be significantly lower than expected. Whether a misrepresentation is made by the loan applicant, the borrower, another third party or one of our employees, we generally bear the risk of loss associated with the misrepresentation. The persons and entities involved in such a misrepresentation are often difficult to locate, and we are often unable to collect any monetary losses that we have suffered from them.

We may bear costs associated with the proliferation of computer theft and cyber-crime.

We necessarily collect, use and hold sensitive data concerning individuals and businesses with whom we have a banking relationship. Threats to data security, including unauthorized access and cyber-attacks, rapidly emerge and change, exposing us to additional costs for protection or remediation and competing time constraints to secure our data in accordance with client expectations and statutory and regulatory requirements. It is not feasible to defend against every risk being posed by changing technologies as well as criminals intent on committing cyber-crime, particularly given their increasing sophistication. Patching and other measures to protect existing systems and servers could be inadequate, especially on systems that are being retired. Controls employed by our information technology department and third-party vendors could prove inadequate. We could also experience a breach by intentional or negligent conduct on the part of our employees or other internal sources, software bugs or other technical malfunctions, or other causes. As a result of any of these threats, our client accounts may become vulnerable to account takeover schemes or cyber-fraud. Our systems and those of our third-party vendors may also become vulnerable to damage or disruption due to circumstances beyond our or their control, such as from network failures, viruses and malware, power anomalies or outages, natural disasters and catastrophic events.

A breach of our security or the security of our third-party vendors that results in unauthorized access to our data could expose us to a disruption or challenges relating to our daily operations as well as to data loss, litigation, damages, fines and penalties, client notification requirements, significant increases in compliance costs, and reputational damage, any of which could individually or in the aggregate have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risks and/or losses to us.

Our risk management framework is comprised of various processes, systems and strategies and is designed to manage the types of risk to which we are subject, including, among others, credit, liquidity, capital, financial performance, asset/liability, operational, compliance and regulatory, Community Reinvestment Act, or CRA,

 

29


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

strategic and reputational, information technology and legal. Our framework also includes financial or other modeling methodologies that involve management assumptions and judgment. Our risk management framework may not be effective under all circumstances, including if our management fails to follow our credit policies and procedures, and thus, it may not adequately mitigate any risk or loss to us. If our framework is not effective, we could suffer unexpected losses and our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. We may also be subject to potentially adverse regulatory consequences.

We depend on our information technology and telecommunications systems, and any systems failures or interruptions could adversely affect our operations and financial condition.

We rely heavily on communications and information systems to conduct our business. Any failure or interruption in the operation of these systems could impair or prevent the effective operation of our client relationship management, general ledger, deposit, lending or other functions. While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent or limit the effect of a failure or interruption in the operation of our information systems, there can be no assurance that any such failures or interruptions will not occur or, if they do occur, that they will be adequately addressed. The occurrence of any failures or interruptions impacting our information systems could damage our reputation, result in a loss of clients, and expose us to additional regulatory scrutiny, civil litigation, and possible financial liability, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We are dependent upon outside third parties for the processing and handling of our records and data.

We rely on software developed by third-party vendors to process various transactions. In some cases, we have contracted with third parties to run their proprietary software on our behalf. These systems include, but are not limited to, general ledger, payroll, employee benefits, loan and deposit processing, and securities portfolio accounting. For example, one vendor provides our core banking system through a service bureau arrangement. While we perform a review of controls instituted by the applicable vendors over these programs in accordance with industry standards and perform our own testing of user controls, we rely on the continued maintenance of controls by these third-party vendors, including safeguards over the security of client data. We may incur a temporary disruption in our ability to conduct business or process transactions, or incur damage to our reputation, if the third-party vendor fails to adequately maintain internal controls or institute necessary changes to systems. Such a disruption or breach of security may have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, we may not be able to obtain or continue to obtain licenses and technologies from these third parties on reasonable terms or at all.

We encounter technological change continually and have fewer resources than certain of our competitors to invest in technological improvements.

The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes, with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to serving clients better, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to reduce costs. Our success will depend in part on our ability to address our clients’ needs by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy client demands for convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations. Certain of our competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements than us, and in the future, we may not be able to implement new technology-driven products and services timely, effectively or at all or be successful in marketing these products and services to our clients. As these technologies are improved in the future, we may, in order to remain competitive, be required to make significant capital expenditures, which may increase our overall expenses and have a material adverse effect on our net income.

 

30


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We may be adversely affected by the lack of soundness of other financial institutions.

Our ability to engage in routine funding transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services companies are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty, and other relationships. We have exposure to different industries and counterparties, and through transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including brokers and dealers, commercial banks, investment banks, and other institutional clients. Defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services companies, or the financial services industry generally, have led to market-wide liquidity problems in the past and could lead to losses or defaults by us or by other institutions in the future. These losses or defaults could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We are subject to environmental liability risk associated with our lending activities.

In the course of our business, we may purchase real estate, or we may foreclose on and take title to real estate. As a result, we could be subject to environmental liabilities with respect to these properties. We may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage, personal injury, investigation and clean-up costs incurred by these parties in connection with environmental contamination or may be required to investigate or clean up hazardous or toxic substances or chemical releases at a property. The costs associated with investigation or remediation activities could be substantial. In addition, if we are the owner or former owner of a contaminated site, we may be subject to common law claims by third parties based on damages and costs resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the property. Any significant environmental liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

By engaging in derivative transactions, we are exposed to additional credit and market risk.

We use interest rate swaps to help manage our interest rate risk from recorded financial assets and liabilities when they can be demonstrated to effectively hedge a designated asset or liability and the asset or liability exposes us to interest rate risk or risks inherent in client related derivatives. As of June 30, 2016, we had $35 million notional value of interest rate swaps. Hedging interest rate risk is a complex process, requiring sophisticated models and routine monitoring, and is not a perfect science. As a result of interest rate fluctuations, hedged assets and liabilities will appreciate or depreciate in market value. The effect of this unrealized appreciation or depreciation will generally be offset by income or loss on the derivative instruments that are linked to the hedged assets and liabilities. We also have derivatives that result from a service we provide to certain qualifying clients approved through our credit process, and therefore, are not used to manage interest rate risk in our assets or liabilities. By engaging in derivative transactions, we are exposed to credit and market risk. If the counterparty fails to perform, credit risk exists to the extent of the fair value gain in the derivative. Market risk exists to the extent that interest rates change in ways that are significantly different from what we expected when we entered into the derivative transaction. The existence of credit and market risk associated with our derivative instruments could adversely affect our net interest income and, therefore, could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We are or may become involved from time to time in suits, legal proceedings, information-gathering requests, investigations and proceedings by governmental and self-regulatory agencies that may lead to adverse consequences.

Many aspects of our business involve substantial risk of legal liability. From time to time, we are, or may become, the subject of lawsuits and related legal proceedings, governmental and self-regulatory agency information-gathering requests, reviews, investigations and proceedings and other forms of regulatory inquiry,

 

31


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

including by bank regulatory agencies, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, and law enforcement authorities. The results of such proceedings could lead to significant civil or criminal penalties, including monetary penalties, damages, adverse judgments, settlements, fines, injunctions, restrictions on the way in which we conduct our business, or reputational harm.

Although we establish accruals for legal proceedings when information related to the loss contingencies represented by those matters indicates both that a loss is probable and that the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated, we may not have accruals for all legal proceedings where we face a risk of loss. In addition, due to the inherent subjectivity of the assessments and unpredictability of the outcome of legal proceedings, amounts accrued may not represent the ultimate loss to us from the legal proceedings or government or other inquiries. Thus, our ultimate losses may be higher, and possibly materially so, than the amounts accrued for legal loss contingencies, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The Nashville MSA is susceptible to floods, tornados and other natural disasters, adverse weather events and acts of God, which may adversely affect our business and operations.

Substantially all of our business and operations are located in the Nashville MSA, which is an area that has recently been damaged by floods and tornadoes and that is susceptible to other natural disasters, adverse weather events and acts of God. Natural disasters, adverse weather events and acts of God can disrupt our operations, cause widespread property damage, and severely depress the local economies in which we operate. Any economic decline as a result of natural disasters, adverse weather events or acts of God can reduce the demand for loans and our other client solutions as well as client ability to repay such loans. In addition, the rates of delinquencies, foreclosures, bankruptcies and losses on loan portfolios may increase substantially, as uninsured property losses or sustained job interruption or loss may materially impair the ability of borrowers to repay their loans. Moreover, the value of real estate or other collateral that secures the loans could be materially and adversely affected by natural disasters, adverse weather events or acts of God. Therefore, natural disasters, adverse weather events or acts of God could result in decreased revenue and loan losses that have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

Our internal controls over financial reporting may not be effective, and our independent registered public accounting firm may not be able to certify as to their effectiveness, which could have a significant and adverse effect on our business and reputation.

We are not currently required to comply with SEC rules that implement Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and are, therefore, not required to make a formal assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting for that purpose. We will be required to comply with these rules upon ceasing to be an emerging growth company, as defined in the JOBS Act.

When evaluating our internal controls over financial reporting, we may identify material weaknesses that we may not be able to remediate in time to meet the applicable deadline imposed upon us for compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In addition, if we fail to achieve and maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented, or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We cannot be certain as to the timing of completion of our evaluation, testing, and any remediation actions or the impact of the same on our operations. If we are not able to implement the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in a timely manner or with adequate compliance, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue an adverse opinion due to ineffective internal controls over financial reporting, and we may be subject to sanctions or investigations by regulatory authorities, such as the SEC. As a result, there could be a negative reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of confidence in the reliability of our financial statements. In addition, we may be required to incur costs in improving our internal control system and hiring additional personnel. Any such action could negatively affect our results of operations and cash flows.

 

32


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Risks Related to Our Industry

We are subject to extensive regulation that could limit or restrict our business activities and impose financial requirements, such as minimum capital requirements, and could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.

We operate in a highly regulated industry and are subject to examination, supervision and comprehensive regulation by various federal and state agencies including the Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, and the TDFI. Regulatory compliance is costly and restricts certain of our activities, including payment of dividends, mergers and acquisitions, investments, loans and interest rates charged, transactions with affiliates, treatment of our clients, and interest rates paid on deposits. We are also subject to financial requirements prescribed by our regulators such as minimum capitalization guidelines, which require us to maintain adequate capital to support our growth. Violations of various laws, even if unintentional, may result in significant fines or other penalties, including restrictions on branching or bank acquisitions and other activities. Recently, banks generally have faced increased regulatory sanctions and scrutiny particularly with respect to the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act, or USA Patriot Act, and other statutes relating to anti-money laundering compliance and client privacy. Recent legislation has substantially changed, and increased, federal regulation of financial institutions, and there may be significant future legislation (and regulations under existing legislation) that could have a further material effect on bank holding companies like us and banks like CapStar Bank.

In July 2013, the U.S. federal banking agencies approved the implementation of the Basel III regulatory capital reforms, or Basel III, and issued rules effecting certain changes to capital adequacy regulations required by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or the Dodd-Frank Act. Basel III is applicable to all U.S. banks that are subject to minimum capital requirements as well as to bank and saving and loan holding companies. The U.S. Basel III rule not only increased most of the required minimum regulatory capital ratios, it introduced a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio and the concept of a capital conservation buffer. The U.S. Basel III rule also narrowed the current definition of capital by establishing additional criteria that capital instruments must meet to be considered additional Tier 1 capital (that is, Tier 1 capital in addition to common equity) and Tier 2 capital. A number of instruments that previously qualified as Tier 1 capital no longer qualify, subject to a grandfather provision that allows certain depository institution holding companies with less than $15 billion in assets to include non-qualifying capital instruments issued prior to May 19, 2010, and phase-out periods for other non-qualifying instruments. In addition, the U.S. Basel III rule permitted banking organizations with less than $15 billion in assets to retain, through a one-time election, the previous treatment of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to unrealized gains and losses for available for sale, or AFS, debt securities. We made this election, and as a result, the effect of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) is “filtered” out of our regulatory capital. The U.S. Basel III rule maintained the general structure of the banking agencies’ prompt corrective action thresholds while incorporating the increased capital requirements, including the common equity Tier 1 capital ratio. In order to be a “well-capitalized” depository institution under the revised prompt corrective action regime, an institution must maintain a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.5% or more; a Tier 1 capital ratio of 8% or more; a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or more; and a leverage ratio of 5% or more. Under the U.S. Basel III rule, banking organizations must also maintain a capital conservation buffer consisting of common equity Tier 1 capital, which will be phased in through 2019. Generally, banking organizations of our size became subject to the U.S. Basel III rule on January 1, 2015, with a phase-in period through 2019 for certain changes.

The laws and regulations applicable to the banking industry could change at any time, and we cannot predict the effects of these changes on our business and profitability. Because government regulation greatly affects the business and financial results of all commercial banks and bank holding companies, our cost of compliance could adversely affect our ability to operate profitably.

 

33


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Federal and state regulators periodically examine our business and may require us to remediate adverse examination findings or may take enforcement action against us.

The Federal Reserve and the TDFI periodically examine our business, including our compliance with laws and regulations. If, as a result of an examination, the Federal Reserve or the TDFI were to determine that our financial condition, capital resources, asset quality, earnings prospects, management, liquidity or other aspects of any of our operations had become unsatisfactory, or that we were in violation of any law or regulation, they may take a number of different remedial actions as they deem appropriate. These actions include the power to require us to remediate any such adverse examination findings.

In addition, these agencies have the power to take enforcement action against us to enjoin “unsafe or unsound” practices, to require affirmative action to correct any conditions resulting from any violation of law or regulation or unsafe or unsound practice, to issue an administrative order that can be judicially enforced, to direct an increase in our capital, to direct the sale of subsidiaries or other assets, to limit dividends and distributions, to restrict our growth, to assess civil monetary penalties against us or our officers or directors, to remove officers and directors and, if it is concluded that such conditions cannot be corrected or there is an imminent risk of loss to depositors, to terminate our deposit insurance and place us into receivership or conservatorship. Any regulatory enforcement action against us could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We are subject to numerous fair lending laws designed to protect consumers and failure to comply with these laws could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.

The CRA, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act and other fair lending laws and regulations prohibit discriminatory lending practices by financial institutions. The U.S. Department of Justice, federal banking agencies, and other federal agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s compliance with fair lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, restrictions on mergers and acquisitions activity, restrictions on expansion, and restrictions on entering new lines of business. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We face a risk of noncompliance and enforcement action with the Bank Secrecy Act and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations.

The Bank Secrecy Act, the USA Patriot Act and other laws and regulations require financial institutions, among other duties, to institute and maintain an effective anti-money laundering program and to file reports such as suspicious activity reports and currency transaction reports. We are required to comply with these and other anti-money laundering requirements. The federal banking agencies and Financial Crimes Enforcement Network are authorized to impose significant civil money penalties for violations of those requirements and have recently engaged in coordinated enforcement efforts against banks and other financial service providers with the U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration and Internal Revenue Service, or IRS. We are also subject to increased scrutiny of compliance with the rules enforced by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, or OFAC. If our policies, procedures and systems are deemed deficient, we would be subject to liability, including fines and regulatory actions, which may include restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and the requirement to obtain regulatory approvals to proceed with certain aspects of our business plan, including our acquisition plans. Failure to maintain and implement adequate programs to combat money laundering and terrorist financing could also have serious reputational consequences for us. Any of these circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

34


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Financial reform legislation has, among other things, tightened capital standards, created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and resulted in new regulations that are likely to increase our costs of operations.

As final rules and regulations implementing the Dodd-Frank Act have been adopted, this law has significantly changed the current bank regulatory framework and affected the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of banks and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting the implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act depends on the rules and regulations that implement it.

Among many other changes, the Dodd-Frank Act eliminated the federal prohibitions on paying interest on demand deposits effective one year after the date of its enactment, thus allowing businesses to have interest-bearing checking accounts. Depending on competitive responses, this significant change to existing law could have an adverse impact on our interest expense. The Dodd-Frank Act permanently increased the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor. The Dodd-Frank Act also directs the federal banking regulators to issue rules prohibiting incentive compensation that encourages inappropriate risks.

The Dodd-Frank Act created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or the CFPB, with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer financial protection laws. The CFPB has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices.

As noted above, many aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to rulemaking and take effect over several years, making it difficult to anticipate the overall financial impact on us. However, compliance with the Dodd-Frank Act and its implementing regulations will result in additional operating and compliance costs that could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

We are required to act as a source of financial and managerial strength for our bank in times of stress.

Under federal law and long-standing Federal Reserve policy, we are expected to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to our bank, and to commit resources to support our bank if necessary. We may be required to commit additional resources to our bank at times when we may not be in a financial position to provide such resources or when it may not be in our, or our shareholders’ or creditors,’ best interests to do so. A requirement to provide such support is more likely during times of financial stress for us and our bank, which may make any capital we are required to raise to provide such support more expensive than it might otherwise be. In addition, any capital loans we make to our bank are subordinate in right of repayment to deposit liabilities of our bank. In the event of our bankruptcy, any commitment by us to a federal banking regulator to maintain the capital of our bank will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to priority of payment over general unsecured creditor claims.

Our FDIC deposit insurance premiums and assessments may increase.

The deposits of our bank are insured by the FDIC up to legal limits and, accordingly, subject it to the payment of FDIC deposit insurance assessments as determined according to the calculation described in “Supervision and Regulation—Bank Regulation and Supervision—FDIC Insurance and Other Assessments.” High levels of bank failures since the financial crisis and increases in the statutory deposit insurance limits have increased resolution costs to the FDIC and put significant pressure on the Deposit Insurance Fund. In order to maintain a strong funding position and restore the reserve ratios of the Deposit Insurance Fund following the financial crisis, the

 

35


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

FDIC increased deposit insurance assessment rates and charged special assessments to all FDIC-insured financial institutions. Further increases in assessment rates or special assessments may occur in the future, especially if there are significant additional financial institution failures. Any future special assessments, increases in assessment rates or required prepayments in FDIC insurance premiums could reduce our profitability or limit our ability to pursue certain business opportunities, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

The federal banking agencies have finalized new liquidity standards that could result in our having to lengthen the term of our funding, restructure our lines of business by forcing us to seek new sources of liquidity for them, and/or increase our holdings of liquid assets.

In September 2014, the U.S. federal banking agencies finalized a new liquidity standard, the liquidity coverage ratio, which requires a large banking organization to hold sufficient “high quality liquid assets” to meet liquidity needs for a 30 calendar day liquidity stress scenario. Although the liquidity coverage ratio does not apply directly to us, the substance of the rule may in the future inform the regulators’ assessment of our liquidity. We could be required to reduce our holdings of illiquid assets, which may adversely affect our results and financial condition. A net stable funding ratio, which imposes a similar requirement over a one-year period, is under consideration for large banking organizations.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock and the Offering

The market price of our common stock may be subject to substantial fluctuations, which may make it difficult for you to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile, which may make it difficult for you to resell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired. There are many factors that may impact the market price and trading volume of our common stock, including, without limitation, the risks discussed elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section and:

 

    actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results, financial condition or asset quality;

 

    publication of research reports about us, our competitors, or the financial services industry generally, or changes in, or failure to meet, securities analysts’ estimates of our financial and operating performance, or lack of research reports by industry analysts or ceasing of coverage;

 

    operating and stock price performance of companies that investors deem comparable to us;

 

    future issuances of our common stock or other securities;

 

    perceptions in the marketplace regarding our competitors and/or us; and

 

    other news, announcements or disclosures (whether by us or others) related to us, our competitors, our core market or the financial services industry.

The stock market and, in particular, the market for financial institution stocks, have experienced substantial fluctuations in recent years, which in many cases have been unrelated to the operating performance and prospects of particular companies. In addition, significant fluctuations in the trading volume in our common stock may cause significant price variations to occur. Increased market volatility may materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock, which could make it difficult to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

 

36


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

An active, liquid market for our common stock may not develop or be sustained following the offering, which may impair your ability to sell your shares.

Before this offering, there has been no established public market for our common stock. Although we have applied to list our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, our application may not be approved. Even if approved, an active, liquid trading market for our common stock may not develop or be sustained following the offering. A public trading market having the desired characteristics of depth, liquidity and orderliness depends upon the presence in the marketplace and independent decisions of willing buyers and sellers of our common stock, over which we have no control. Without an active, liquid trading market for our common stock, shareholders may not be able to sell their shares at the volume, prices and times desired. Moreover, the lack of an established market could materially and adversely affect the value of our common stock.

Securities analysts may not initiate or continue coverage of our common stock, which could adversely affect the market for our common stock.

The trading market for our common stock will depend in part on the research and reports that securities analysts publish about us and our business. We do not have any control over these securities analysts, and they may not cover our common stock. If securities analysts do not cover our common stock, the lack of research coverage may adversely affect its market price. If we are covered by securities analysts, and our common stock is the subject of an unfavorable report, the price of our common stock may decline. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to publish regular reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause the price or trading volume of our common stock to decline.

We have broad discretion in the use of the net proceeds from this offering, and our use of those proceeds may not yield a favorable return on your investment.

We expect to use the net proceeds of this offering, along with available cash, for general corporate purposes, which may include, among other things, the support of balance sheet growth, the acquisition of other banks or financial institutions or other complementary businesses to the extent such opportunities arise, and the maintenance of our capital and liquidity ratios, and the ratios of our bank, at appropriate levels. Our management has broad discretion over how these proceeds are used and could spend the proceeds in ways with which you may not agree. In addition, we may not use the proceeds of this offering effectively or in a manner that increases our market value or enhances our profitability. We have not established a timetable for the effective deployment of the proceeds, and investing the offering proceeds in securities until we are able to deploy the proceeds will provide lower margins that we generally earn on loans, potentially adversely affecting shareholder returns, including earnings per share, return on assets and return on equity.

Investors in this offering will experience immediate and substantial dilution.

The initial public offering price is expected to be substantially higher than the tangible book value per share of our common stock immediately following this offering. Therefore, if you purchase shares in this offering, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution in tangible book value per share in relation to the price that you paid for your shares. We expect the dilution as a result of the offering to be $4.74 per share, based on an assumed initial public offering price of $15.50 per share (the midpoint of the range on the cover page of this prospectus), and our tangible book value of $10.54 per share as of June 30, 2016. Accordingly, if we were liquidated at our tangible book value, you would not receive the full amount of your investment.

A future issuance of stock could dilute the value of our common stock.

Our charter permits us to issue up to an aggregate of 25 million shares of common stock. As of September 13, 2016, 8,684,699 shares of our common stock were issued and outstanding, including 210,074 shares of restricted common stock that have yet to vest. Those shares outstanding do not include the potential issuance, as of September 13, 2016, of 1,609,756 shares of our common stock that are issuable upon conversion of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock, including any such shares to be converted in connection with this offering, 1,029,125

 

37


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

shares of our common stock subject to issuance upon exercise of outstanding stock options under the Stock Incentive Plan, 797,319 shares of our common stock that are issuable pursuant to exercise of outstanding warrants, including any such shares to be issued pursuant to the exercise of warrants in connection with this offering, and 183,636 additional shares of our common stock that were reserved for issuance under the Stock Incentive Plan. A future issuance of any new shares of our common stock would, and equity-related securities could, cause further dilution in the value of our outstanding shares of common stock.

If a substantial number of shares become available for sale and are sold in a short period of time, the market price of our common stock could decline.

If our existing shareholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market following this offering, the market price of our common stock could decrease significantly. The perception in the public market that our existing shareholders might sell shares of common stock could also depress our market price and hinder our ability to raise equity capital in the future. Upon completion of this offering, we will have 10,795,870 shares of common stock outstanding, or 11,183,620 shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, in each case assuming no exercise of outstanding options or of warrants other than those being exercised by a selling shareholder in connection with this offering.

All of the 2,585,000 shares of common stock sold in this offering (or 2,972,750 shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full) will be freely tradable without further restriction or registration under the Securities Act, except that our directors, executive officers, and certain additional other holders of our common stock will be subject to the lock-up agreements described in “Underwriting” and the Rule 144 requirements described in “Shares Eligible for Future Sale.” After expiration of the lock-up periods and pursuant to compliance with Rule 144, 2,783,742 additional shares, or 26% of our outstanding shares of common stock (assuming the underwriters do not exercise their option to purchase additional shares and assuming no exercise of outstanding options or of warrants other than those being exercised by a selling shareholder in connection with this offering), will be eligible for sale in the public market. The market price of shares of our common stock may drop significantly when these resale restrictions lapse. A decline in the price of shares of our common stock might impede our ability to raise capital through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities and could result in a decline in the value of the shares of our common stock purchased in this offering.

In addition, we plan to file a registration statement on Form S-8 under the Securities Act to register an aggregate of 1,422,835 shares of common stock for issuance under our Stock Incentive Plan, of which 1,239,199 shares are subject to outstanding options to purchase such shares and 183,636 are reserved for future issuance. We may issue all of these shares without any action or approval by our shareholders, and these shares, once issued (including upon exercise of outstanding options), will be available for sale into the public market, subject to the restrictions described in “Shares Eligible for Future Sale.”

Following this offering, our directors, executive officers and principal shareholders will continue to have the ability to exert influence over our business and corporate affairs.

Our executive officers, directors and principal shareholders, as a group, beneficially owned approximately 50.7% of our outstanding shares as of September 13, 2016. Upon consummation of this offering, that same group, in the aggregate, will beneficially own approximately 35% of our outstanding shares, assuming no exercise by the underwriters of their over-allotment option and no exercise of outstanding options or of outstanding warrants other than those being exercised by a selling shareholder in connection with this offering and after giving effect to the issuance of shares in this offering (including any shares purchased by our existing shareholders). As a result of their ownership, our executive officers, directors and principal shareholders will continue to have the ability, by voting their shares in concert, to influence the outcome of all matters submitted to our shareholders for approval, as well as our management and affairs. This concentration of voting power could delay or prevent an acquisition of our Company on terms that other shareholders may desire, which in turn could depress our share price and may prevent attempts by our shareholders to replace or remove the board of directors or management.

 

38


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

In addition, pursuant to the terms of the Second Amended and Restated Shareholders’ Agreement, or SARSA, among us, our bank, Corsair III Financial Services Capital Partners, L.P., Corsair III Financial Services Offshore 892 Partners, L.P., or together, the Corsair funds, and certain other investors, the Corsair funds may recommend one nominee to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the boards of directors of the Company and our bank for election to such boards, subject to any required regulatory and shareholder approvals. All shareholders party to the SARSA have agreed to vote their shares to elect such nominee upon recommendation by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the Company and our bank and approval by the boards of directors and all applicable regulatory authorities (if necessary). This right of the Corsair funds is not expected to terminate in connection with this offering. See “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Related Party Transactions—Second Amended and Restated Shareholders’ Agreement” for additional information.

There are substantial regulatory limitations on changes of control of bank holding companies.

With certain limited exceptions, federal regulations prohibit a person or company or a group of persons deemed to be “acting in concert” from, directly or indirectly, acquiring 10% or more (5% if the acquirer is a bank holding company) of any class of our voting stock or obtaining the ability to control in any manner the election of a majority of our directors or otherwise direct the management or policies of our company without prior notice or application to and the approval of the Federal Reserve. Accordingly, prospective investors need to be aware of and comply with these requirements, if applicable, in connection with any purchase of shares of our common stock. These provisions effectively inhibit certain mergers or other business combinations, which, in turn, could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

We have the ability to incur debt and pledge our assets, including our stock in our bank, to secure that debt.

We have the ability to incur debt and pledge our assets to secure that debt. Absent special and unusual circumstances, a holder of indebtedness for borrowed money has rights that are superior to those of holders of our common stock. For example, interest must be paid to a lender before dividends can be paid to our shareholders, and, in the case of liquidation, our borrowings must be repaid before we can distribute any assets to our shareholders. Furthermore, we would have to make principal and interest payments on our indebtedness, which could reduce our profitability or result in net losses on a consolidated basis even if our bank were profitable.

The rights of our common shareholders are subordinate to the rights of the holders of our Series A Preferred Stock and any debt securities that we may issue and may be subordinate to the holders of any other class of preferred stock that we may issue in the future.

As of September 13, 2016, we have issued 1,609,756 shares of our Series A Preferred Stock, and we expect 878,049 shares of our Series A Preferred Stock to be outstanding following this offering. These shares have certain rights that are senior to our common stock. Holders of our Series A Preferred Stock are entitled to receive, when, as and if declared by our board of directors, cash dividends to the same extent and on the same basis as cash dividends as declared by our board of directors with respect to common stock. Such dividends on shares of Series A Preferred Stock are payable on the same dates as dividends on shares of common stock but prior to the payment of any dividends on shares of common stock. In the event of our bankruptcy, dissolution or liquidation, the holders of our Series A Preferred Stock are entitled to receive a liquidation preference of $10.25 per share of Series A Preferred Stock, plus any amount equal to all dividends declared and unpaid thereon, before any distributions can be made to the holders of our common stock.

Our charter authorizes our board of directors to issue an aggregate of up to five million shares of preferred stock without any further action on the part of our shareholders. Our board of directors also has the power, without shareholder approval, to set the terms of any series of preferred stock that may be issued, including voting rights, dividend rights, and preferences over our common stock with respect to dividends or in the event of

 

39


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

a dissolution, liquidation or winding up and other terms. Accordingly, you should assume that any shares of preferred stock that we may issue in the future will also be senior to our common stock. In the event that we issue preferred stock in the future that has preference over our common stock with respect to payment of dividends or upon our liquidation, dissolution or winding up, or if we issue preferred stock with voting rights that dilute the voting power of our common stock, the rights of the holders of our common stock or the market price of our common stock could be adversely affected.

We and our bank are subject to capital and other legal and regulatory requirements which restrict our ability to pay dividends, and we do not intend to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.

We are subject to certain restrictions on the payment of cash dividends as a result of banking laws, regulations and policies. In addition, because our bank is our only material asset, our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders depends on our receipt of dividends from the bank, which is also subject to restrictions on dividends as a result of banking laws, regulations and policies. Finally, our board of directors intends to retain all of our earnings to promote growth and build capital. Accordingly, we do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, if the receipt of dividends over the near term is important to you, you should not invest in our common stock. For additional information, see “Dividend Policy.”

Tennessee and federal law limits the ability of others to acquire us or the bank, which may restrict your ability to fully realize the value of your common stock.

In many cases, shareholders receive a premium for their shares when one company purchases another. Tennessee and federal law makes it difficult for anyone to purchase us or our bank without approval of our board of directors and the approval of state and federal regulators. Thus, your ability to realize the potential benefits of any sale by us may be limited, even if such sale would represent a greater value for shareholders than our continued independent operation.

An investment in our common stock is not an insured deposit and is subject to risk of loss.

Our common stock is not a bank deposit and, therefore, is not insured against loss by the FDIC, the Deposit Insurance Fund or by any other public or private entity. Investment in our common stock is inherently risky for the reasons described in this “Risk Factors” section and is subject to the same market forces that affect the price of common stock in any company. As a result, an investor may lose some or all of such investor’s investment in our common stock.

Our corporate governance documents, and certain corporate and banking laws applicable to us, may adversely affect our common shareholders and could make a takeover of us more difficult.

Certain provisions of our charter and bylaws and corporate and federal banking laws could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of our organization, even if those events were perceived by many of our shareholders as beneficial to their interests. These provisions, and the corporate and banking laws and regulations applicable to us:

 

    provide that special meetings of shareholders, unless otherwise prescribed by the TBCA, may be called only by our board of directors, by the Chairman of our board of directors, by the President and Chief Executive Officer or by the Secretary acting under the instructions of any of the foregoing;

 

    enable our board of directors by a majority vote to increase the number of persons serving as directors up to the maximum of 25 and to fill the vacancies created as a result of the increase by a majority vote of the directors then in office;

 

    require no more than 120 days’ and no less than 75 days’ advance notice of nominations for the election of directors and the presentation of shareholder proposals at meetings of shareholders;

 

    enable our board of directors to amend our bylaws without shareholder approval;

 

40


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    require either (i) the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our directors then in office and the affirmative vote of a majority of our outstanding shares entitled to vote or (ii) the affirmative vote of a majority of our directors then in office and the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our outstanding shares entitled to vote, if the TBCA or other applicable law requires shareholder approval of a merger, share exchange or sale, lease, exchange or other disposition of all or substantially all of our assets and either (i) the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our directors then in office or (ii) the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our outstanding shares entitled to vote to amend or rescind the immediately preceding provision;

 

    do not provide for cumulative voting rights (therefore prohibiting shareholders from giving more than one vote per share to any single director nominee); and

 

    require prior regulatory application and approval of any transaction involving control of our organization.

These provisions may adversely affect our common shareholders and could discourage potential acquisition proposals and could delay or prevent a change in control, including under circumstances in which our shareholders might otherwise receive a premium over the market price of our shares.

We are an “emerging growth company,” and the reduced regulatory and reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as described in the JOBS Act. For as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company we may take advantage of reduced regulatory and reporting requirements that are otherwise generally applicable to public companies. These include, without limitation, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced financial reporting requirements, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation, a potential exemption from new auditing standards adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and exemptions from the requirements of holding non-binding advisory votes on executive compensation and golden parachute payments.

We may take advantage of these provisions for up to five years, unless we earlier cease to be an emerging growth company, which would occur if our annual gross revenue exceeds $1.0 billion, if we issue more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt in a three-year period, or if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of any June 30 before that time, in which case we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the following December 31. Investors may find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these reduced regulatory and reporting requirements, which may result in a less active trading market and increased volatility in our stock price.

Fulfilling our public company financial reporting and other regulatory obligations will be expensive and time consuming, and it may strain our resources and negatively impact our operations.

Following this offering, we will become subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the related rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC. These laws and regulations increase the scope, complexity and cost of corporate governance, reporting and disclosure practices over those of non-public or non-reporting companies. Despite our conducting business in a highly regulated environment, these laws and regulations have different requirements for compliance than we experienced prior to becoming a reporting company. Our expenses related to services rendered by our accountants, legal counsel and consultants have increased in order to ensure compliance with these laws and regulations that we became subject to as a reporting company and may increase further as we become a public company and grow in size. These provisions, as well as any other aspects of current or proposed regulatory or legislative changes to laws applicable to us may impact the profitability of our business activities and may change certain of our business practices, including our ability to offer new products, obtain financing, attract deposits, make loans and achieve satisfactory interest spreads and could expose us to additional costs, including increased compliance costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our assets, business, cash flow, condition (financial or otherwise), liquidity, prospects and results of operations.

 

41


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

We have made statements in this prospectus, including within the sections entitled “Prospectus Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business,” that constitute forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, future events and our financial performance. These statements are often, but not always, made through the use of words or phrases such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “predict,” “potential,” “believe,” “will likely result,” “expect,” “continue,” “will,” “anticipate,” “seek,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “projection,” “forecast,” “goal,” “target,” “would,” and “outlook,” or the negative version of those words or other comparable words of a future or forward-looking nature. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, and are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about our industry, management’s beliefs and certain assumptions made by management, many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and beyond our control. The inclusion of these forward-looking statements should not be regarded as a representation by us, the selling shareholders, the underwriters or any other person that such expectations, estimates and projections will be achieved. Accordingly, we caution you that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, assumptions and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable as of the date made, actual results may prove to be materially different from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements.

There are or will be important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated in these forward-looking statements, including, but are not limited to, the following:

 

    economic conditions (including interest rate environment, government economic and monetary policies, the strength of global financial markets and inflation and deflation) that impact the financial services industry as a whole and/or our business;

 

    the concentration of our business in the Nashville MSA and the effect of changes in the economic, political and environmental conditions on this market;

 

    increased competition in the financial services industry, locally, regionally or nationally, which may adversely affect pricing and the other terms offered to our clients;

 

    our dependence on our management team and board of directors and changes in our management and board composition;

 

    our reputation in the community;

 

    our ability to execute our strategy and to achieve loan and deposit growth through organic growth and strategic acquisitions;

 

    credit risks related to the size of our borrowers and our ability to adequately assess and limit our credit risk;

 

    our concentration of large loans to a small number of borrowers;

 

    the significant portion of our loan portfolio that originated during the past two years and therefore may less reliably predict future collectability than older loans;

 

    the adequacy of reserves (including our allowance for loan and lease losses) and the appropriateness of our methodology for calculating such reserves;

 

    adverse trends in the healthcare service industry, which is an integral component of our market’s economy;

 

    our management of risks inherent in our commercial real estate loan portfolio, and the risk of a prolonged downturn in the real estate market, which could impair the value of our collateral and our ability to sell collateral upon any foreclosure;

 

42


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements
    governmental legislation and regulation, including changes in the nature and timing of the adoption and effectiveness of new requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act, Basel guidelines, capital requirements, accounting regulation or standards and other applicable laws and regulations;

 

    the loss of large depositor relationships, which could force us to fund our business through more expensive and less stable sources;

 

    operational and liquidity risks associated with our business, including liquidity risks inherent in correspondent banking;

 

    volatility in interest rates and our overall management of interest rate risk, including managing the sensitivity of our interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities to interest rates, and the impact to our earnings from a change in interest rates;

 

    the potential for our bank’s regulatory lending limits and other factors related to our size to restrict our growth and prevent us from effectively implementing our business strategy;

 

    strategic acquisitions we may undertake to achieve our goals;

 

    the sufficiency of our capital, including sources of capital and the extent to which we may be required to raise additional capital to meet our goals;

 

    fluctuations to the fair value of our investment securities that are beyond our control;

 

    deterioration in the fiscal position of the U.S. government and downgrades in Treasury and federal agency securities;

 

    potential exposure to fraud, negligence, computer theft and cyber-crime;

 

    the adequacy of our risk management framework;

 

    our dependence on our information technology and telecommunications systems and the potential for any systems failures or interruptions;

 

    our dependence upon outside third parties for the processing and handling of our records and data;

 

    our ability to adapt to technological change;

 

    the financial soundness of other financial institutions;

 

    our exposure to environmental liability risk associated with our lending activities;

 

    our engagement in derivative transactions;

 

    our involvement from time to time in legal proceedings and examinations and remedial actions by regulators;

 

    the susceptibility of our market to natural disasters and acts of God; and

 

    the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting and our ability to remediate any future material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting.

The foregoing factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with other cautionary statements that are included in this prospectus, including those discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors.” If one or more events related to these or other risks or uncertainties materialize, or if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect, actual results may differ materially from our forward-looking statements. Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date of this prospectus, and we do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law. New risks and uncertainties may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict their occurrence or how they will affect us.

 

43


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

USE OF PROCEEDS

Assuming an initial public offering price of $15.50 per share, which is the midpoint of the offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, we estimate that the net proceeds to us from the sale of our common stock in this offering will be $17.1 million, (or $22.7 million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of common stock from us), after deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses. Each $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering by $1.2 million, or $1.6 million (if the underwriters elect to exercise in full their purchase option), assuming the number of shares we sell, as set forth on the cover of this prospectus, remains the same, after deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses.

We intend to use the net proceeds to us from this offering, along with available cash, for general corporate purposes, which may include the support of our balance sheet growth, the acquisition of other banks or financial institutions or other complementary businesses to the extent such opportunities arise, and the maintenance of our capital and liquidity ratios, and the ratios of our bank, at acceptable levels. We have not specifically allocated the amount of net proceeds to us that will be used for these purposes, and our management will have broad discretion over how these proceeds are used.

We plan to invest these proceeds in short term investments until needed for the uses described above.

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling shareholders.

 

44


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

DIVIDEND POLICY

Holders of our common stock are only entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by our board of directors out of funds legally available for dividends. We have not paid any cash dividends on our capital stock since inception, and we do not intend to pay dividends for the foreseeable future. As a Tennessee corporation, we are not permitted to pay dividends if, after giving effect to such payment, we would not be able to pay our debts as they become due in the usual course of business or our total assets would be less than the sum of our total liabilities plus any amounts needed to satisfy any preferential rights if we were dissolving.

Because we are a bank holding company and do not engage directly in business activities of a material nature, our ability to pay any dividends on our common stock depends, in large part, upon our receipt of dividends from our bank, which is also subject to numerous limitations on the payment of dividends under federal and state banking laws, regulations and policies. Pursuant to Tennessee law, our bank may not, without the prior approval of the Commissioner of the TDFI, pay any dividends to us in a calendar year in excess of the total of our bank’s net income for that year plus the retained net income for the preceding two years. For additional information, see “Supervision and Regulation—Bank Regulation and Supervision—Payment of Dividends.”

Our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders in the future will depend on regulatory restrictions and our liquidity and capital requirements, as well as our earnings and financial condition, the general economic climate, contractual restrictions, our ability to service any equity or debt obligations senior to our common stock and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors.

 

45


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock, your ownership interest will be diluted to the extent the initial public offering price per share of our common stock exceeds the pro forma tangible book value per share of our common stock immediately following this offering. As of June 30, 2016, the tangible book value of our common stock was approximately $91.5 million, or $10.54 per share of common stock based on 8,683,902 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding. Tangible book value per share represents common equity less intangible assets and goodwill, divided by the number of shares of our common stock outstanding.

After giving effect to our sale of 1,294,787 shares of our common stock in this offering (assuming the underwriters do not exercise their purchase option) at an assumed initial public offering price of $15.50 per share, the midpoint of the price range on the cover of this prospectus, deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses and assuming no exercise of outstanding options or of warrants other than those being exercised by a selling shareholder in connection with this offering, the pro forma tangible book value of our common stock at June 30, 2016 would have been approximately $116.1 million, or $10.76 per share. Therefore, this offering will result in an immediate increase of $0.22 in the tangible book value per share of our common stock of existing shareholders and an immediate dilution of 4.74 in the tangible book value per share of our common stock to investors purchasing shares in this offering, or approximately 31% of the assumed public offering price of $15.50 per share.

If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares of our common stock in full, the pro forma tangible book value per share of common stock after giving effect to this offering would be approximately $10.89 per share (assuming no exercise of outstanding options or of warrants other than those being exercised by a selling shareholder in connection with this offering), and the dilution in pro forma tangible book value per share of common stock to new investors in this offering would be approximately $4.61.

The following table illustrates the calculation of the amount of dilution per share that a new investor of our common stock in this offering will incur given the assumptions above:

 

Assumed initial public offering price

   $ 15.50   

Tangible book value per share of common stock at June 30, 2016

     10.54   

Increase in tangible book value per share of common stock attributable to new investors

     0.22   

Pro forma tangible book value per share of common stock after this offering

     10.76   

Dilution per share of common stock to new investors in this offering

     4.74   

The following table illustrates the differences between the number of shares of common stock purchased from us, the total consideration paid, and the average price per share paid by existing shareholders and new investors purchasing shares of our common stock in this offering based on an assumed initial public offering price of $15.50 per share, the midpoint of the price range on the cover of this prospectus, and before deducting estimated underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses as of June 30, 2016 on a pro forma basis.

 

     Shares Purchased     Total Consideration
(Dollars in thousands)
    Average
Price
Per Share
 
     Number      Percent     Amount      Percent    

Shareholders as of June 30, 2016

     8,683,902         87   $ 83,407         81   $ 9.60   

New investors in this offering

     1,294,787         13        20,069         19        15.50   

Total

     9,978,689         100   $ 103,476         100   $ 10.37   

Assuming no shares are sold to existing shareholders in this offering, sales of shares of our common stock by the selling shareholders in this offering will reduce the number of shares of common stock held by existing shareholders to 8,210,073, or approximately 76% of the total shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering, and will increase the number of shares held by new investors to 2,585,000, or approximately 24% of the total shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering.

 

46


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

If the underwriters exercise their purchase option in full, the percentage of shares of our common stock held by existing shareholders will decrease to approximately 73% of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering, and the number of shares held by new investors will be increased to 2,972,750, or approximately 27% of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering.

The table and the two immediately preceding paragraphs above exclude the following as of June 30, 2016:

 

    878,049 shares of common stock issuable upon the conversion of Series A Preferred Stock that is not included in this offering, but include 731,707 shares of common stock that will be issued upon the conversion of Series A Preferred Stock by one of our selling shareholders and offered for sale as part of this offering;

 

    1,029,125 shares of our common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options at a weighted average exercise price of $10.52 per share;

 

    547,319 shares of our common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants at a weighted average exercise price of $10.16 per share, but include 84,677 shares of common stock that will be issued upon the exercise of outstanding warrants at an exercise price of $15.50 per share, which is the midpoint of the offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, by one of our selling shareholders and offered for sale as part of this offering; and

 

    183,636 shares of our common stock reserved for issuance pursuant to awards granted under the Stock Incentive Plan.

To the extent that any of the foregoing are converted or exercised, investors participating in the offering will experience further dilution.

 

47


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our consolidated capitalization as of June 30, 2016:

 

    on an actual basis;

 

    on an as adjusted basis to give effect to the net proceeds from the sale by us of 1,294,787 shares of our common stock in this offering (assuming the underwriters do not exercise their purchase option), at an assumed offering price of $15.50 per share (the midpoint of the offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), after deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses.

You should read this information together with the sections entitled “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Description of Capital Stock” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     As of June 30, 2016  
     Actual     As adjusted  
     (Dollars in thousands,
except per share data)
 

Shareholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, par value $1.00 per share, 5,000,000 shares authorized Series A Nonvoting Noncumulative perpetual convertible preferred Stock, 1,609,800 shares authorized; 1,609,756 shares issued and outstanding, actual; 878,049 shares issued and outstanding, as adjusted

   $ 1,610      $ 878   

Common stock, par value $1.00 per share, 20,000,000 shares authorized; 8,683,902 shares issued and outstanding, actual; 10,795,073 shares issued and outstanding, as adjusted

     8,684        10,795   

Non-voting common stock, par value $1.00 per share, 5,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding, actual and as adjusted

              

Additional paid-in-capital

     95,629        111,380   

Retained earnings

     12,096        12,096   

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

     (3,701     (3,701
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity:

   $ 114,318      $ 131,448   

Book value per share, reported

   $ 11.26      $ 11.34   

Book value per share, adjusted (1)

     11.11        11.26   

Tangible book value per share, reported (1)

     10.54        10.76   

Tangible book value per share, adjusted (1)

     10.49        10.72   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) This is a non-GAAP financial measure. See “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data—GAAP Reconciliation and Management Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures” for a reconciliation of this measure to its most comparable GAAP measure.

We and our bank both meet the minimum regulatory capital requirements applicable to us under federal banking regulations. The following table sets forth the minimum required regulatory capital and our consolidated capital ratios as of June 30, 2016, on an actual basis and on an as adjusted basis to give effect to the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting the estimated underwriting discount and offering expenses.

 

     AMOUNT      RATIO     Minimum
Requirement (1)
    Basel III Fully
Phased-In
Requirement (2)
 
     Actual      As
Adjusted
     Actual     As
Adjusted
     
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Tier 1 Leverage Capital

   $ 110,269       $ 127,399         8.9     10.3     4.0     4.0

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital

     110,269         127,399         9.7        11.2        6.0        8.5   

Total Risk-Based Capital

     120,889         138,019         10.7        12.1        8.0        10.5   

Common Equity Tier 1 Capital

     94,451         111,581         8.3        9.8        4.5        7.0   

 

(1) For the calendar year 2016, we must maintain a capital conservation buffer of Common Equity Tier 1 capital in excess of minimum risk-based capital ratios by at least 0.625% to avoid limits on capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments to executive officers and similar employees.
(2) Reflects full implementation of the capital conservation buffer.

 

48


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

PRICE RANGE OF OUR COMMON STOCK

Prior to this offering, our common stock has not been traded on an established public trading market, and quotations for our common stock were not reported on any market. As a result, there has been no regular market for our common stock. Although shares of our common stock may have been sporadically traded in private transactions, the prices at which such transactions occurred may not necessarily reflect the price that would be paid for our common stock in an active market. As of August 31, 2016, there were approximately 702 holders of record of our common stock.

We anticipate that this offering and the anticipated listing of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market will result in a more active trading market for our common stock. However, we cannot assure you that a liquid trading market for our common stock will develop or be sustained after this offering. You may not be able to sell your shares quickly or at the market price if trading in our common stock is not active. See the section of this prospectus titled “Underwriting” for more information regarding our arrangements with the underwriters and the factors considered in setting the initial public offering price.

 

49


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF

FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto and other financial information appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. In addition to historical information, this discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations. Factors that could cause such differences are discussed in the sections entitled “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” We assume no obligation to update any of these forward-looking statements except to the extent required by law.

The following discussion pertains to our historical results, on a consolidated basis. However, because we conduct all of our material business operations through our wholly owned subsidiary, CapStar Bank, the discussion and analysis relates to activities primarily conducted at the subsidiary level.

All dollar amounts in the tables in this section are in thousands of dollars, except per share data or when otherwise specifically noted.

Overview

Our Business

We are a bank holding company headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee, and we operate primarily through our wholly owned subsidiary, CapStar Bank, a Tennessee-chartered state bank. We are a commercial bank that seeks to establish and maintain comprehensive relationships with our clients by delivering customized and creative banking solutions and superior client service. Our products and services include (i) commercial and industrial loans to small and medium sized businesses, with a particular focus on businesses operating in the healthcare industry, (ii) commercial real estate loans, (iii) private banking and wealth management services for the owners and operators of our business clients and other high net worth individuals and (iv) correspondent banking services to meet the needs of Tennessee’s smaller community banks. Our operations are presently concentrated in demographically attractive and fast-growing counties in the Nashville MSA. As of June 30, 2016, on a consolidated basis, we had total assets of $1.3 billion, total deposits of $1.1 billion, total net loans of $877.0 million, and shareholders’ equity of $114.3 million.

Primary Factors Affecting Comparability

American Security Bank and Trust Company. On July 31, 2012, our bank completed its acquisition of American Security, a Tennessee banking corporation headquartered in Hendersonville, Tennessee. Our bank acquired all outstanding shares of common stock of American Security for approximately $15.2 million in total consideration which was comprised of the issuance of approximately 1.5 million shares of common stock of our bank. At the time of the acquisition, American Security had two banking locations located in Sumner County, Tennessee. The operations of American Security are included in CapStar Bank’s financial statements beginning on July 31, 2012.

Farmington Financial Group, LLC. On February 3, 2014, CapStar Bank completed its acquisition of Farmington, a Tennessee limited liability company headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. Farmington primarily originates residential real estate loans that are sold in the secondary market. The bank acquired all the assets and liabilities of Farmington for approximately $6.4 million in total consideration which was comprised of $3.0 million in cash, 100,000 shares of common stock of our bank and a five year earn-out based on pre-tax income. The operations of Farmington are included in CapStar Bank’s financial statements beginning on February 3, 2014.

 

50


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared based on the application of certain accounting policies, the most significant of which are described in Note 1 to our Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2015, which are contained elsewhere in this prospectus. Certain of these policies require numerous estimates and strategic or economic assumptions that may prove inaccurate or subject to variation and may materially and adversely affect our reported results and financial position for the current period or future periods. The use of estimates, assumptions, and judgments are necessary when financial assets and liabilities are required to be recorded at, or adjusted to reflect, fair value. Assets carried at fair value inherently result in more financial statement volatility. Fair values and information used to record valuation adjustments for certain assets and liabilities are either based on quoted market prices or are provided by other independent third-party sources, when available. When such information is not available, management estimates valuation adjustments based upon historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Management evaluates our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Changes in underlying factors, assumptions or estimates in any of these areas could have a material impact on our future financial condition and results of operations.

We have identified the following accounting policies and estimates that, due to the difficult, subjective or complex judgments and assumptions inherent in those policies and estimates and the potential sensitivity of our financial statements to those judgments and assumptions, are critical to an understanding of our financial condition and results of operations. We believe that the judgments, estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of our financial statements are reasonable and appropriate.

Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses

We record estimated probable inherent credit losses in the loan portfolio as an allowance for loan and lease losses. The methodologies and assumptions for determining the adequacy of the overall allowance for loan and lease losses involve significant judgments to be made by management. Some of the more critical judgments supporting our allowance for loan and lease losses include judgments about the credit-worthiness of borrowers, estimated value of underlying collateral, assumptions about cash flow, determination of loss factors for estimating credit losses, and the impact of current events, conditions, and other factors impacting the level of inherent losses. Under different conditions or using different assumptions, the actual or estimated credit losses ultimately realized by us may be different from our estimates. In determining the allowance, we estimate losses on individual impaired loans and on groups of loans that are not impaired, where the probable loss can be identified and reasonably estimated. On a quarterly basis, we assess the risk inherent in our loan portfolio based on qualitative and quantitative trends in the portfolio, including the internal risk classification of loans, historical loss rates, changes in the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, industry or borrower concentrations, delinquency trends, detailed reviews of significant loans with identified weaknesses, and the impacts of local, regional, and national economic factors on the quality of the loan portfolio. Based on this analysis, we may record a provision for loan and lease losses in order to maintain the allowance at appropriate levels. For a more complete discussion of the methodology employed to calculate the allowance for loan and lease losses, see Note 1 to our Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2015, which are included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Investment Securities Impairment

We assess on a quarterly basis whether there have been any events or economic circumstances to indicate that a security with respect to which there is an unrealized loss is impaired on an other-than-temporary basis. In any instance, we would consider many factors, including the severity and duration of the impairment, our intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient for a recovery in value, recent events specific to the issuer or industry, and, for debt securities, external credit ratings and recent downgrades. Securities with respect to which there is an unrealized loss that is deemed to be other-than-temporary are written down to fair value.

 

51


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Income Taxes

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed using the asset and liability method, which recognizes a liability or asset representing the tax effects, based on current tax law, of future deductible or taxable amounts attributable to events recognized in the financial statements. A valuation allowance may be established to the extent necessary to reduce the deferred tax asset to a level at which it is “more likely than not” that the tax asset or benefit will be realized. Realization of tax benefits depends on having sufficient taxable income, available tax loss carrybacks or credits, the reversal of taxable temporary differences and/or tax planning strategies within the reversal period, and that current tax law allows for the realization of recorded tax benefits.

Business Combinations

Assets purchased and liabilities assumed in a business combination are recorded at their fair value. The fair value of a loan portfolio acquired in a business combination requires greater levels of management estimates and judgment than the remainder of purchased assets or assumed liabilities. When the loans have evidence of credit deterioration since origination and it is probable at the date of acquisition that the Company will not collect all contractually required principal and interest payments, the loans are considered impaired, and the expected cash flows in excess of the amount paid are recorded as interest income over the remaining life of the loan. The excess of the loan’s contractual principal and interest over expected cash flows is not recorded. We must estimate expected cash flows at each reporting date. Subsequent decreases to the expected cash flows will generally result in a provision for loan and lease losses. Subsequent increases in cash flows result in a reversal of the provision for loan and lease losses to the extent of prior charges and adjusted accretable yield which will have a positive impact on interest income. Purchased loans without evidence of credit deterioration are recorded at their initial fair value and adjusted as necessary for subsequent advances, pay downs, amortization or accretion of any premium or discount on purchase, charge-offs and additional provisions that may be required.

Results of Operations

Net Income

The following table sets forth the principal components of net income for the periods indicated.

 

(Dollars in thousands)

   Six Months Ended June 30,     Twelve Months Ended December 31,  
   2016      2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
        2014          Change
from the
Prior
Year
        2013      

Interest income

   $  21,513       $ 19,430         10.7   $ 40,504         5.8   $ 38,287         (7.0 )%    $ 41,157   

Interest expense

     3,355         2,911         15.3     5,731         (2.4 )%      5,871         (10.7 )%      6,576   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income

     18,158         16,519         9.9     34,773         7.3     32,416         (6.3 )%      34,581   

Provision for loan and lease losses

     1,120         721         55.4     1,651         (57.3 )%      3,869         312.3     938   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision

     17,038         15,798         7.8     33,122         16.0     28,547         (15.1 )%      33,643   

Noninterest income

     4,939         4,331         14.0     8,884         19.7     7,419         281.3     1,946   

Noninterest expense

     15,961         15,050         6.1     30,977         8.5     28,562         12.3     25,432   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income before taxes

     6,016         5,079         18.4     11,029         49.0     7,404         (27.1 )%      10,157   

Income tax expense

     1,956         1,649         18.6     3,470         43.8     2,412         (35.7 )%      3,749   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 4,060       $ 3,430         18.4   $ 7,559         51.4   $ 4,992         (22.1 )%    $ 6,408   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

52


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

For the six months ended June 30, 2016, our net income was $4.1 million, compared to $3.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015. The 18.4% increase resulted from strong loan growth and continued growth in noninterest income.

Net interest income increased $1.6 million, or 9.9%, as a result of our loan growth. Average loans increased 17.5% compared to the prior-year period as a result of increases in the number of our bankers in the Nashville MSA and continued focus on attracting new clients to our Company. We funded this growth in loans through an increase in our deposits and by shifting funds out of lower yielding investment securities. Our increase in interest income on loans was partially offset by an increase in our interest expense. The average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities was 0.75% for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to 0.68% for the prior-year period. A portion of the increase was due to the 0.25% increase in the Fed Funds rate in December 2015. The net interest margin (the ratio of net interest income to average earning assets) for the six months ended June 30, 2016 was 3.13% compared to 3.04% for the same period in 2015.

For the six months ended June 30, 2016, we recorded a provision for loan and lease losses of $1.1 million as compared to $721,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2015. The increase was primarily related to loan growth.

Noninterest income was $4.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, a 14.0% increase as compared to the prior-year period. This growth was primarily attributable to increased production in our fee based loan and deposit products and mortgages. The growth in mortgage fee income reflects continuing purchase activity due to low mortgage rates and the overall vibrancy of the residential real estate market in the Nashville MSA. Mortgage originations were predominantly sourced from new loan originations as opposed to the refinancing of existing loans.

Noninterest expense was $16.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, a 6.1% increase as compared to the prior-year period, primarily due to an increase in employee costs. The number of full-time employees increased from 151 at June 30, 2015 to 166 at June 30, 2016.

Income tax expense was $2.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $1.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015. Our effective tax rates for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 were 32.5% and 32.5%, respectively.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

For the year ended December 31, 2015, our net income was $7.6 million, compared to $5.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of 51.4%. The largest contributing factors leading to the increase in net income include continued loan growth, improvement in the overall quality of our loan portfolio, and growth in noninterest income driven by our mortgage line of business.

Net interest income was $34.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $2.4 million, or 7.3%, resulting from higher levels of loan balances. Average loans increased 9.1% compared to the prior-year period as a result of increases in the number of our bankers in the Nashville MSA and continued focus on attracting new clients to our Company. We funded this growth in loans through an increase in our deposits and shifting funds out of lower yielding investment securities. Our increase in interest income on loans was partially offset by a decrease in loan yields. Average loan yields declined 21 basis points compared to the prior-year period due to continued competitive pricing pressures associated with securing the business of credit-worthy borrowers in the Nashville MSA. The increase in net interest income was also due to lower deposit costs compared to the prior-year period. The average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities was 0.68% for the year ended December 31, 2015, down 4 basis points from the prior-year period. Both average interest-bearing

 

53


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

transaction and average noninterest-bearing deposits grew most notably as we continued to build core deposit relationships across our lines of business. Average noninterest-bearing deposits increased 26.8% for the year ended December 31, 2015, while average interest-bearing transaction deposits increased 28.8%.

Our provision for loan and lease losses for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $1.7 million, compared to $3.9 million for the prior-year period. The primary driver of this decrease was a specific provision of $2.4 million for one particular loan that was recognized in 2014 and subsequently charged off during 2015.

Noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $8.9 million, a 19.7% increase as compared to the prior-year period, primarily driven by the impact of a full year of revenue from our mortgage line of business, which was purchased in February 2014, as well as increased mortgage production. Mortgage fee income increased as a result of continued strong purchase and refinance activity due to low mortgage rates and a strong residential real estate market in the Nashville MSA. Loan fee income of $822,000 during the year ended December 31, 2015 represented a decrease of 12.6% as compared to the prior-year period due to a shift in focus within our healthcare line of business from transaction-based activity to relationship generating activities.

Noninterest expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $31.0 million, a 8.5% increase as compared to the prior-year period, primarily due to an increase between periods in employee costs. During the year ended December 31, 2015, we added bankers in our healthcare and commercial and industrial lines of business. In addition, we added the wealth management line of business and experienced a full year of expenses in connection with our acquisition of Farmington. The number of full-time employees increased from 157 at December 31, 2014 to 162 at December 31, 2015. Furthermore, during the year ended December 31, 2015, we made significant investments in our infrastructure, which we believe will allow us to operate more efficiently and effectively as a public company. We believe that these investments enable us to execute our growth strategy and provide us with a scalable and efficient operating model. We believe that our overhead costs as a percentage of our revenue will decrease over time.

Income tax expense was $3.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. Our effective tax rates for 2015 and 2014 were 31.5% and 32.6%, respectively. The decrease in the 2015 effective tax rate was due primarily to utilization of one-time tax credits. Total income tax expense increased $1.1 million as compared to the prior-year period, primarily driven by the impact of $3.6 million of additional income before taxes.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

For the year ended December 31, 2014, our net income was $5.0 million, compared to $6.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, a decrease of 22.1%. The largest contributing factors leading to the decrease were an increase in provision for loan and lease losses of $2.4 million related to one loan, which was subsequently charged off during 2015, and decreased interest income related to purchase accounting of $2.2 million. Excluding these items, we experienced growth in our business during the year ended December 31, 2014, including growth in earning assets and deposits. We also closed on the acquisition of Farmington in February 2014, which increased our fee income product offerings to our clients.

Net interest income was $32.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $2.2 million, or 6.3%, resulting from lower levels of purchase accounting interest income associated with our acquisition of American Security as well as a lower rate cycle. Although average loans increased 7.2% during the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the prior-year period, the average yield on loans was 4.7% during the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to 5.5% during the year ended December 31, 2013, as a result of lower levels of purchase accounting interest income associated with our acquisition of American Security as well as a lower rate cycle. The ten-year Treasury rate declined from 3.02% at December 31, 2013 to 2.25% at December 31, 2014. The impact of these events resulted in a decline in our net interest spread from 3.31% for the year ended December 31, 2013 to 3.06% for the year ended December 31, 2014 and a decline in our net interest

 

54


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

margin from 3.45% for the year ended December 31, 2013 to 3.20% for the year ended December 31, 2014. We funded our growth in loans through an increase in our noninterest-bearing deposits and shifting funds out of lower yielding investment securities. Average noninterest-bearing deposits increased 31.1% for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the prior-year period as we continued to build core deposit relationships across our lines of business, especially correspondent banking settlement accounts.

Provision for loan and lease losses for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $3.9 million and $938,000, respectively. The primary driver of the increase was due to loan growth and a specific reserve of $2.4 million for one loan that was recognized in 2014. In addition we recognized $1.1 million of net charge-offs for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Noninterest income for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $7.4 million and $1.9 million, respectively, primarily driven by mortgage fee income during 2014 as a result of our acquisition of Farmington in February 2014, as well as increases in other sources of fee income. Service charges and fees on deposit accounts of $1.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 represented an increase of $306,000 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2013. This increase resulted from treasury management fees in our commercial and industrial line of business and our expansion of correspondent bank settlement deposit accounts. Loan fee income of $941,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014 represented an increase of $354,000 as compared to the prior-year period due to fees generated from our commercial and industrial and healthcare lines of business. The income from bank-owned life insurance increased $640,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the prior-year period due to a full year of income on an investment in bank-owned life insurance purchased in December 2013.

Noninterest expense for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $28.6 million and $25.4 million, respectively, an increase of $3.1 million, which was primarily due to expenses incurred as a result of the acquisition of Farmington in February 2014. In addition, data processing and software expense increased $605,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014, or 30.8%, due to the expansion of our correspondent banking settlement services platform. Increases in other components of noninterest expense during the year ended December 31, 2014 were due to our increased asset size and volumes. In addition, our employee costs rose between periods as the number of full-time employees increased from 126 at December 31, 2013 to 157 at December 31, 2014, most notably due to the Farmington acquisition.

Income tax expense was $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. Our effective tax rates for 2014 and 2013 were 32.6% and 36.9%, respectively. The decrease in the 2014 effective tax rate was due primarily to an increase in tax-exempt interest income and earnings on life insurance contracts.

Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin Analysis

The largest component of our net income is net interest income – the difference between the income earned on interest-earning assets and the interest paid on deposits and borrowed funds used to support our assets. Net interest income divided by average earning assets represents our net interest margin. The major factors that affect net interest income and net interest margin are changes in volumes, the yield on interest-earning assets and the cost of interest-bearing liabilities. Our margin can also be affected by economic conditions, the competitive environment, loan demand and deposit flow. Our ability to respond to changes in these factors by using effective asset-liability management techniques is critical to maintaining the stability of the net interest margin and our primary source of earnings.

 

55


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

The following tables show for the periods indicated the average balance of each principal category of our assets, liabilities, and shareholders’ equity and the average yields on assets and average costs of liabilities. Such yields and costs are calculated by dividing income or expense by the average daily balances of the associated assets or liabilities.

AVERAGE BALANCE SHEET AND NET INTEREST ANALYSIS

 

     For the Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2016     2015  

(Dollars in thousands, except yields and rates)

   Average
Outstanding
Balance
     Interest
Income/
Expense
     Average
Yield/
Rate
    Average
Outstanding
Balance
     Interest
Income/
Expense
     Average
Yield/
Rate
 

Interest-Earning Assets

                

Loans (1)

   $ 848,048       $ 18,180         4.31   $ 721,759       $ 15,857         4.43

Loans exempt from federal income tax

                                              
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total loans (gross)

     848,048         18,180         4.31     721,759         15,857         4.43

Loans held for sale

     36,427         693         3.83     28,548         548         3.87

Securities:

                

Taxable investment securities

     182,436         1,949         2.14     247,390         2,417         1.95

Investment securities exempt from federal income tax (2)

     43,999         549         2.50     38,946         524         2.69
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total securities

     226,435         2,498         2.21     286,336         2,941         2.05

Cash balances in other banks

     51,607         133         0.52     55,673         74         0.26

Funds sold

     2,328         9         0.78     3,149         10         0.64
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest-earning assets

   $ 1,164,845       $ 21,513         3.71   $ 1,095,465       $ 19,430         3.58

Noninterest-earning assets

     49,407              48,951         
  

 

 

         

 

 

       

Total assets

   $ 1,214,252            $  1,144,416         
  

 

 

         

 

 

       

Interest-Bearing Liabilities

                

Interest-bearing transaction accounts

   $ 242,791       $ 692         0.57   $ 139,765       $ 350         0.50

Savings and money market deposits

     445,224         1,451         0.66     480,703         1,389         0.58

Time deposits

     185,474         1,020         1.11     208,729         1,072         1.04

Borrowings and repurchase agreements

     30,399         192         1.27     33,458         100         0.60
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

  

 

$

 

903,888

 

  

  

 

$

 

3,355

 

  

  

 

 

 

0.75

 

% 

 

 

$

 

862,655

 

  

  

 

$

 

2,911

 

  

  

 

 

 

0.68

 

% 

Noninterest-bearing deposits

     186,965              166,083         
  

 

 

         

 

 

       

Total funding sources

  

 

 

 

1,090,853

 

  

       

 

 

 

1,028,738

 

  

     

Noninterest-bearing liabilities

     11,704              10,710         

Shareholders’ equity

     111,695              104,968         
  

 

 

         

 

 

       

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

  

 

$

 

1,214,252

 

  

       

 

 

$

 

 

1,144,416

 

 

  

     
  

 

 

         

 

 

       

Net interest spread (3)

           2.96 %            2.90 % 
     

 

 

         

 

 

    

Net interest income/margin (4)

      $ 18,158         3.13 %       $ 16,517         3.04 % 
     

 

 

         

 

 

    

 

(1) Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans. Interest income on loans includes amortization of deferred loan fees, net of deferred loan costs.
(2) Balances for investment securities exempt from federal income tax are not calculated on a tax equivalent basis.
(3) Net interest spread is the average yield on total interest-earning assets minus the average rate on total interest-bearing liabilities.
(4) Net interest margin is net interest income divided by total interest-earning assets.

 

56


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

AVERAGE BALANCE SHEET AND NET INTEREST ANALYSIS

 

      For the Year Ended December 31,   
      2015        2014        2013   
(Dollars in thousands, except
yields and rates)
  Average
Outstanding
Balance
    Interest
Income/
Expense
    Average
Yield/
Rate
    Average
Outstanding
Balance
    Interest
Income/
Expense
    Average
Yield/
Rate
    Average
Outstanding
Balance
    Interest
Income/
Expense
    Average
Yield/
Rate
 

Interest-Earning Assets

                 

Loans (1)

  $ 744,151      $ 33,722        4.53   $ 682,218      $ 32,311        4.74   $ 636,123      $ 34,839        5.48

Loans exempt from federal income tax

                  0.00                   0.00                   0.00
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans (gross)

  $ 744,151      $ 33,722        4.53   $ 682,218      $ 32,311        4.74   $ 636,123      $ 34,839        5.48

Loans held for sale

    29,324        1,123        3.83     11,733        492        4.19                     

Securities:

                 

Taxable Investment Securities

    220,167        4,421        2.01     222,137        4,397        1.98     279,317        5,584        2.00

Investment Securities Exempt from Federal Income Tax (2)

    40,160        1,080        2.69     32,616        914        2.80     22,198        574        2.59
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total securities

    260,327        5,501        2.11     254,753        5,311        2.08     301,515        6,158        2.04

Cash balances in other banks

    54,143        140        0.26     59,952        148        0.25     59,219        148        0.25

Funds sold

    3,094        18        0.60     4,185        25        0.60     4,088        12        0.29
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest-earning assets

  $ 1,091,039      $ 40,504        3.71   $ 1,012,840      $ 38,287        3.78   $ 1,000,946      $ 41,157        4.11

Noninterest-earning assets

    49,721            51,865            27,763       
 

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

     

Total assets

  $ 1,140,760          $ 1,064,705          $ 1,028,709       
 

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

     

Interest-Bearing Liabilities

                 

Interest-bearing transaction accounts

  $ 143,939      $ 748        0.52   $ 111,725      $ 599        0.54   $ 93,158      $ 517        0.56

Savings and money market deposits

    465,622        2,733        0.59     453,984        2,754        0.61     480,224        3,404        0.71

Time deposits

    197,535        2,031        1.03     217,647        2,323        1.07     220,002        2,488        1.13

Borrowings and repurchase agreements

    39,581        218        0.55     32,404        195        0.60     26,131        166        0.64
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

  $ 846,678      $ 5,731        0.68   $ 815,760      $ 5,871        0.72   $ 819,516      $ 6,577        0.80

Noninterest-bearing deposits

    176,577            139,312            106,271       
 

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

     

Total funding sources

    1,023,255            955,072            925,787       

Noninterest-bearing liabilities

    10,778            8,603            3,769       

Shareholders’ equity

    106,727            101,030            99,153       
 

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

     

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

  $ 1,140,760          $ 1,064,705          $ 1,028,709       
 

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

     

Net interest spread (3)

        3.03         3.06         3.31
   

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

   

Net interest income/margin (4)

    $ 34,773        3.19     $ 32,416        3.20     $ 34,581        3.45
   

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

   

 

(1) Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans. Interest income on loans includes amortization of deferred loan fees, net of deferred loan costs.
(2) Balances for investment securities exempt from federal income tax are not calculated on a tax equivalent basis.
(3) Net interest spread is the average yield on total interest-earning assets minus the average rate on total interest-bearing liabilities.
(4) Net interest margin is net interest income divided by total interest-earning assets.

 

57


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

The following table reflects, for the periods indicated, the changes in our net interest income due to changes in the volume of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and the associated rates paid or earned on these assets and liabilities.

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN NET INTEREST INCOME

 

    For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
    For the Year Ended December 31,  
    2016 vs. 2015     2015 vs. 2014     2014 vs. 2013  
    Variance Due To     Variance Due To     Variance Due To  

(Dollars in thousands)

  Volume     Yield/
Rate
    Total     Volume     Yield/
Rate
    Total     Volume     Yield/
Rate
    Total  

Interest-Earning Assets

                 

Loans

  $ 2,775      $ (452   $ 2,322      $ 2,933      $ (1,523   $ 1,410      $ 2,524      $ (5,052   $ (2,528

Loans exempt from federal income tax

                                                              
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans (gross)

  $ 2,775      $ (452   $ 2,322      $ 2,933      $ (1,523   $ 1,410      $ 2,524      $ (5,052   $ (2,528

Loans held for sale

    151        (7     145        737        (106     631        492               492   

Securities:

                                                              

Taxable investment securities

    (635     166        (468     (39     62        23        (1,143     (44     (1,187

Investment securities exempt from federal income tax

    68        (43     25        211        (45     166        269        71        340   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total securities

    (567     123        (443     172        17        189        (874     27        (847

Cash balances in other banks

    (5     66        61        (14     7        (7     2        (3     (1

Funds sold

    (3     1        (2     (7     0        (6     0        13        13   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest-earning assets

  $ 2,351      $ (268   $ 2,083      $ 3,822      $ (1,605   $ 2,217      $ 2,145      $ (5,015   $ (2,870

Interest-Bearing Liabilities

                 

Interest-bearing transaction accounts

  $ 258      $ 85      $ 342      $ 173      $ (24   $ 149      $ 103      $ (21   $ 82   

Savings and money market deposits

    (103     165        62        71        (91     (21     (186     (464     (651

Time deposits

    (119     68        (52     (215     (77     (291     (27     (139     (166

Borrowings and repurchase agreements

    (9     101        92        43        (20     23        40        (11     29   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

  $ 27      $ 418      $ 445      $ 72      $ (212   $ (140   $ (70   $ (636   $ (706

Net Interest Income

                 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income

  $ 2,325      $ (686   $ 1,638      $ 3,750      $ (1,393   $ 2,357      $ 2,214      $ (4,379   $ (2,165
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

Net interest income increased $1.6 million, or 9.9%, to $18.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $16.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, primarily due to higher levels of loan balances partially offset by an increase in our interest-bearing liability costs.

Total interest-earning assets averaged $1.2 billion for the six months ended June 30, 2016, an increase of $69.4 million, or 6.3%, from the prior-year period. For the six months ended June 30, 2016, loans, as a percentage of total interest-earning assets, were 73%, compared to 66% for the prior-year period.

Average loans increased 17.5% compared to the prior-year period as a result of increases in the number of our bankers in the Nashville MSA and continued focus on attracting new clients to our Company. Interest income on loans due to additional volumes increased $2.4 million but was slightly offset by lower loan yields. Average loan yields decreased from 4.43% for the six months ended June 30, 2015 to 4.31% for the six months ended June 30, 2016. The decrease in loan yields was primarily due to the lower loan rates on new loan production as compared to the average yield on the current loan portfolio, driven by continued competitive pricing pressures associated with securing the business of credit-worthy borrowers in the Nashville MSA. The resulting yield on average interest-earning assets increased from 3.58% for the six months ended June 30, 2015 to 3.71% for the six months ended June 30, 2016 despite the above noted loan yield decrease.

 

58


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We funded this growth in loans through an increase in our funding sources of 6.0% and shifting approximately 20.9% of our investment securities to higher yield loans. Our increase in interest income on loans was partially offset by an increase in our interest-bearing liability costs. Interest-bearing liabilities averaged $903.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $862.7 million for the prior-year period, an increase of $41.2 million, or 4.8%. The average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities was 0.75% for the six months ended June 30, 2016, as compared to 0.68% for the prior-year period. A portion of the increase was due to the 0.25% increase in the Fed Funds rate in December 2015. We passed along a portion of this rate increase to our clients.

The impact of the above resulted in a widening of our net interest spread between periods from 2.90% to 2.96% and a widening of our net interest margin between periods from 3.04% to 3.13%.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

Net interest income increased $2.4 million, or 7.3%, to $34.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $32.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, primarily due to higher levels of loan balances and decreased interest-bearing liability costs.

Total interest-earning assets averaged $1.1 billion for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of $78.2 million, or 7.7%, from the prior-year period. For the year ended December 31, 2015, loans, as a percentage of total interest-earning assets, were 68%, compared to 67% for the prior-year period.

Average loans increased 9.1% compared to the prior-year period as a result of increases in the number of our bankers in the Nashville MSA and continued focus on attracting new clients to our Company. Interest income on loans due to additional volumes increased $2.9 million but was partially offset by $1.5 million due to lower loan yields. Average loan yields decreased from 4.74% for the year ended December 31, 2014 to 4.53% for the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease in loan yields was primarily due to the lower loan rates on new loan production as compared to the average yield on the existing loan portfolio, as well as continued competitive pricing pressures associated with securing the business of credit-worthy borrowers in the Nashville MSA. The resulting average yield on average interest-earning assets decreased from 3.78% for the year ended December 31, 2014 to 3.71% for the year ended December 31, 2015 due to the above noted loan yield decline.

We funded this growth in loans through an increase in our funding sources of 7.1%. Interest-bearing liabilities averaged $846.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $815.8 million for the prior-year period, an increase of $30.9 million, or 3.8%. Our average noninterest deposits increased $37.3 million between periods, or 26.8%, to $176.6 million as of December 31, 2015. Our increase in net interest income on loans was also due to a decrease in our interest-bearing liability costs. The average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities was 0.68% for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to 0.72% for the prior-year period.

The impact of the above resulted in a slight decrease of our net interest spread between periods from 3.06% to 3.03% and a slight decline of our net interest margin between periods from 3.20% to 3.19%.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

Net interest income decreased $2.2 million, or 6.3%, to $32.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $34.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, primarily due to lower levels of purchase accounting interest income associated with our acquisition of American Security as well as a lower rate cycle.

Total interest-earning assets averaged $1.0 billion for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of $11.9 million, or 1.2%, from the prior-year period. For the year ended December 31, 2014, loans, as a percentage of total interest-earning assets, were 67%, compared to 64% for the prior-year period.

 

59


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Average loans increased 7.3% compared to the prior-year period as a result of increases in the number of our bankers in the Nashville MSA and increased focus on attracting new clients to our Company. Interest income on loans due to additional volumes increased $2.5 million which was offset by $5.1 million due to lower loan yields and purchase accounting interest income associated with our acquisition of American Security. Average loan yields decreased from 5.48% for the year ended December 31, 2013 to 4.74% for the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease in loan yields was primarily due to the lower levels of purchase accounting interest income as well as a lower rate cycle. The ten-year Treasury rate declined from 3.02% at December 31, 2013 to 2.25% at December 31, 2014.

We funded this growth in loans through an increase in our funding sources of 3.2% and shifting funds out of lower yielding investment securities. Average investments decreased 15.5% during the period. Interest-bearing liabilities averaged $815.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $819.5 million for the prior-year period, a decrease of $3.8 million or 0.5%. Our average noninterest deposits increased $33.0 million between periods, or 31.1%, to $139.3 million as of December 31, 2014, as we continued to build core deposit relationships across our lines of business, with a large increase of 67.3% between periods from correspondent banking settlement accounts. Interest-bearing transaction accounts continued to grow as well, with $111.7 million on average for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $93.2 million for the prior-year period, an increase of 19.9%. The average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities was 0.72%, compared to 0.80% for the prior-year period, which was a result of proactively managing deposit costs with rate sensitive clients and growing other low cost funding within interest-bearing transaction accounts at lower rates.

The impact of the above actions resulted in a decrease of our net interest spread between periods from 3.31% to 3.06% and a decrease in our net interest margin between periods from 3.45% to 3.20%.

Provision for Loan and Lease Losses

Our policy is to maintain an allowance for loan and lease losses at a level sufficient to absorb probable incurred losses inherent in the loan portfolio. The allowance is increased by a provision for loan and lease losses, which is a charge to earnings, is decreased by charge-offs and increased by loan recoveries. In determining the adequacy of our allowance for loan and lease losses, we consider our historical loan loss experience, the general economic environment, the overall portfolio composition and other relevant information. As these factors change, the level of loan and lease loss provision changes.

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

For the six months ended June 30, 2016, we recorded a provision for loan and lease losses of $1.1 million as compared to $721,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2015. The increase in provision for loan and lease losses was primarily related to loan growth of $79.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to $12.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

Provision for loan and lease losses for the year ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 was $1.7 million and $3.9 million, respectively. The primary driver of this decrease was a specific reserve of $2.4 million for one loan that was recognized in 2014 and subsequently charged off in 2015.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

Provision for loan and lease losses for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $3.9 million and $938,000, respectively. The primary driver of the increase was due to an increase in the loan portfolio and a specific reserve of $2.4 million for one loan that was recognized in 2014. In addition we recognized $1.1 million of net charge-offs for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

60


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Noninterest Income

In addition to net interest margin, we generate other types of recurring noninterest income from our lines of business. Our banking operations generate revenue from service charges and fees on deposit accounts. We have a mortgage banking line of business that generates revenue from originating and selling mortgages, and we have a revenue-sharing relationship with a registered broker-dealer, which generates wealth management fees. In addition to these types of recurring noninterest income, we own insurance on several key employees and record income on the increase in the cash surrender value of these policies.

The following table sets forth the principal components of noninterest income for the periods indicated.

NONINTEREST INCOME

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,     Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands)

   2016      2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2014      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2013  

Noninterest Income

                    

Service charges on deposit accounts

   $ 529       $ 432         22.2   $ 910         (15.8 )%    $ 1,080         39.5   $ 774   

Loan commitment fees

     572         325         76.0     822         (12.6 )%      941         60.3     587   

Net gain (loss) on sale of securities

     125         57         119.4     55         308.9     13         (81.6 )%      73   

Net gain on sale of loans

     3,002         2,950         1.8     5,962         46.6     4,067         6790.2     59   

Other noninterest income

     711         566         25.6     1,135         (13.9 )%      1,318         190.9     453   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total noninterest income

   $  4,939       $ 4,331         14.0   $ 8,884         19.7   $ 7,419         281.3   $ 1,946   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

Noninterest income for the six months ended June 30, 2016 was $4.9 million, a 14.0% increase as compared to the six months ended June 30, 2015. All categories of noninterest income experienced an increase. Mortgage fee income increased due to the continued benefit from purchase activity due to low mortgage rates and a vibrant residential real estate market in the Nashville MSA. Loan and deposit related fees increased due to increased production and enhanced positioning of services to our clients.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

Noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2015 was $8.9 million, a 19.7% increase as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. Mortgage fee income increased due to the continued benefit from strong purchase and refinance activity due to low mortgage rates and a vibrant residential real estate market in the Nashville MSA. Loan fee income of $822,000 reflected a 12.6% decrease in such fee income between periods due to a shift in focus within our healthcare line of business from transaction-based activity to relationship generating activities.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

Noninterest income for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $7.4 million and $1.9 million, respectively. Mortgage fee income increased due to the acquisition of Farmington in February 2014. Service charges and fees on deposit accounts were $1.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 and increased $306,000 compared to the year ended December 31, 2013. This increase resulted from treasury management fees in our commercial and industrial line of business and our expansion of correspondent bank settlement deposit

 

61


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

accounts. Loan fee income was $941,000 and increased $354,000 during 2014 from fees generated from our commercial and industrial and healthcare lines of business. The income from bank-owned life insurance increased $640,000 during 2014 due to a full year of income on an investment in bank-owned life insurance purchased in December 2013.

Noninterest Expense

Our total noninterest expense increase reflects expenses that we have incurred as we build the foundation to support our recent growth and enable us to execute our growth strategy. We believe that our overhead costs as a percentage of our revenue will decrease over time. The following table presents the primary components of noninterest expense for the periods indicated.

NONINTEREST EXPENSE

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,     Twelve Months Ended December 31,  

(Dollars in thousands)

   2016      2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2015      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2014      Change
from the
Prior
Year
    2013  

Noninterest Expense

                    

Salaries and employee benefits

   $ 10,156       $ 9,422         7.8   $ 19,278         10.3   $ 17,474         9.1   $ 16,019   

Data processing and software

     1,203         1,214         (0.9 )%      2,317         (9.7 )%      2,566         30.8     1,962   

Occupancy

     781         791         (1.2 )%      1,538         1.8     1,512         34.8     1,122   

Equipment

     843         758         11.2     1,598         26.9     1,259         15.3     1,092   

Professional fees

     757         739         2.4     1,469         8.2     1,357         (16.4 )%      1,623   

Regulatory fees

     492         462         6.5     915         (2.8 )%      941         (2.3 )%      963   

Other real estate expense

     14         27         (49.1 )%      34         (86.0 )%      243         (6.4 )%      259   

Other expenses

     1,715         1,637         4.8     3,827         19.2     3,210         34.2     2,391   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total noninterest expense

   $ 15,961       $ 15,050         6.1   $ 30,977         8.5   $ 28,562         12.3   $ 25,431   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

Noninterest expense for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 was $16.0 million and $15.1 million, respectively. The largest increase between periods within noninterest expense was related to employee costs as salaries and employee benefits increased due to our expanded presence in the Nashville MSA. The number of full-time employees increased from 151 at June 30, 2015 to 166 at June 30, 2016.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

Noninterest expense for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 was $31.0 million and $28.6 million, respectively. The largest increase between periods within noninterest expense was related to employee costs as salaries and employee benefits increased as we expanded our presence in the Nashville MSA and increased incentive payments to certain executive officers and other non-executive employees attributable to enhanced performance at both the Company and individual employee levels. The number of full-time employees increased from 157 at December 31, 2014 to 160 at December 31, 2015. We also incurred a full year of expenses related to our acquisition of Farmington in February 2014. Furthermore, during 2014 and 2015, we made significant investments in our infrastructure, which we believe will allow us to operate more efficiently and effectively as a public company. At the end of 2014, we renegotiated our core processing contract with Fidelity Information Services, LLC, or FIS, and outsourced our information technology services, which we believe will allow us to better manage the costs and risks associated with information technology and data processing. FIS has agreed to provide certain information technology services under this contract until July 31, 2020. After this initial term, these services may be renewed for an additional period of up to five years. Additionally, we upgraded and automated our financial

 

62


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

reporting tools and allowance for loan and lease loss model. As a result of these investments, our equipment expense increased $339,000, which was partially offset by decreased fees in our data processing expenses. We believe that these investments will enable us to execute our growth strategy and provide us with a scalable and efficient operating model and that our overhead costs as a percentage of our revenue will decrease over time.

Contingent consideration expenses associated with our mortgage line of business, which are included in other expenses in the table above, increased $574,000 during 2015, primarily due to higher mortgage originations. The changes in the other components of noninterest expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 are due to our increasing asset size and volumes.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

Noninterest expense for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 was $28.6 million and $25.4 million, respectively, an increase of $3.1 million, which was primarily due to expenses incurred as a result of the acquisition of Farmington in February 2014. In addition, data processing and software expense increased $605,000 during the year ended December 31, 2014, or 30.8%, due to the expansion of our correspondent banking settlement services platform. Increases in other components of noninterest expense during the year ended December 31, 2014 were due to our increased asset size and volumes. In addition our employee costs rose between periods as the number of full-time employees increased from 126 at December 31, 2013 to 157 at December 31, 2014, most notably due to the Farmington acquisition.

Income Tax Provision

The provision for income taxes includes both federal and state taxes. Fluctuations in effective tax rates reflect the effect of the differences in the inclusion or deductibility of certain income and expenses for income tax purposes. Our future effective income tax rate will fluctuate based on the mix of taxable and tax-free investments we make, periodic increases in surrender value of bank-owned life insurance policies for certain named executive officers and our overall taxable income.

Six months ended June 30, 2016 compared to six months ended June 30, 2015

Income tax expense was $2.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $1.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015. Our effective tax rates for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 were 32.5% and 32.5%, respectively.

Year ended December 31, 2015 compared to year ended December 31, 2014

Income tax expense was $3.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015, compared to $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014. Our effective tax rates for 2015 and 2014 were 31.5% and 32.6%, respectively. The decrease in the 2015 effective tax rate was due primarily to utilization of one-time tax credits. Total income tax expense increased $1.1 million as compared to the prior-year period, primarily driven by the impact of $3.6 million of additional income before taxes.

Year ended December 31, 2014 compared to year ended December 31, 2013

Income tax expense was $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. Our effective tax rates for 2014 and 2013 were 32.6% and 36.9%, respectively. The decrease in the 2014 effective tax rate was due primarily to an increase in tax-exempt interest income and earnings on life insurance contracts.

Financial Condition

Our total assets at June 30, 2016 were $1.3 billion, an increase of $103.6 million, or 8.6%, over total assets of $1.2 billion at December 31, 2015. Total loans and leases increased $79.0 million, or 9.8%, to $887.4 million at

 

63


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

June 30, 2016 compared to $808.4 million at December 31, 2015. AFS securities were $171.3 million at June 30, 2016 compared to $173.4 million at December 31, 2015, a decrease of $2.0 million. Total deposits increased by $104.8 million, or 10.1%, to $1.1 billion between December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2016.

Our total assets at December 31, 2015 were $1.2 billion, an increase of $78.4 million, or 6.9%, over total assets of $1.1 billion at December 31, 2014. Loan growth was the primary reason for the increase. Total loans and leases increased $95.3 million, or 13.4%, to $808.4 million at December 31, 2015 compared to $713.1 million at December 31, 2014, while AFS securities declined $63.2 million, or 26.7%, to $173.4 million at December 31, 2015 compared to $236.6 million at December 31, 2014. Total deposits increased $57.4 million, or 5.9%, to $1.0 billion between December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2015.

Our total assets at December 31, 2014 were $1.1 billion, an increase of $119.7 million, or 11.9%, over total assets of $1.0 billion at December 31, 2013. Loan growth was the primary reason for the increase. Total loans and leases increased $86.7 million, or 13.8%, to $713.1 million at December 31, 2014 compared to $626.4 million at December 31, 2013. Total deposits increased $102.0 million, or 11.6%, to $981.1 million between December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2014.

Investment Portfolio

Our investment portfolio is used to provide liquidity through cash flow, marketability and collateral for borrowings, manage interest rate risk and the corresponding risk to the bank’s market value, maximize the bank’s profitability (includes minimizing tax liability), manage the diversification of the bank’s asset base, and maintain adequate risk-based capital levels. We manage our investment portfolio according to a written investment policy approved by our board of directors. Investment balances in our securities portfolio are subject to change over time based on our funding needs and interest rate risk management objectives. Our liquidity levels take into account anticipated future cash flows and all available sources of credit, and are maintained at levels management believes are appropriate to assure future flexibility in meeting our anticipated funding needs.

Our investment portfolio consists primarily of securities issued by U.S. government-sponsored agencies, obligations of states and political subdivisions, mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities and other debt securities, all with varying contractual maturities. However, these maturities do not necessarily represent the expected life of the securities as some of these securities may be called or paid down without penalty prior to their stated maturities. The investment portfolio is regularly reviewed by the Asset Liability Management committee, or ALCO, of the bank to ensure an appropriate risk and return profile as well as for adherence to the investment policy.

Although our investment portfolio consists mainly of AFS securities, during the third quarter of 2013, approximately $36.8 million of AFS securities were transferred to the held to maturity, or HTM, category. The transfers of the securities into the HTM category from the AFS category were made at fair value at the date of transfer. The unrealized holding loss at the date of the transfer continues to be reported as a separate component of shareholders’ equity and is being amortized over the remaining life of the securities as an adjustment of yield in a manner consistent with the amortization of the premiums and discounts.

The carrying values of our AFS securities are adjusted on a monthly basis for unrealized gain or loss as a valuation allowance, and any gain or loss is reported on an after-tax basis as a component of other comprehensive income in shareholders’ equity. Periodically, we may need to assess whether there have been any events or economic circumstances to indicate that a security on which there is an unrealized loss is impaired on an other-than-temporary basis. In any such instance, we would consider many factors, including the severity and duration of the impairment, our intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient for a recovery in value, recent events specific to the issuer or industry, and for debt securities, external credit ratings and recent downgrades. Securities on which there is an unrealized loss that is deemed to be other-than-temporary are written down to fair value, with the write-down recorded as a realized loss in securities gains (losses). There are currently no securities which management has deemed other-than-temporarily impaired.

 

64


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Our AFS securities decreased to $171.3 million as of June 30, 2016, down from $173.4 million at December 31, 2015. The carrying value of AFS securities has been trending down over the past several years, as management has redeployed these funds into higher-earning loans. As of June 30, 2016, AFS securities having a carrying value of $129.6 million were pledged to secure borrowings or municipal deposits.

The following table presents the book value of securities available for sale and held to maturity by type at June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013.

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

 

     June 30,
2016
     December 31,  
        2015      2014      2013  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Securities Available for Sale:

           

U.S. government-sponsored agencies

   $ 5,616       $ 19,542       $ 15,582       $ 2,869   

Obligations of states and political subdivisions (1)

     17,795         13,868         8,665         1,116   

Mortgage-backed securities

     126,636         118,380         183,733         207,249   

Asset-backed securities

     21,290         21,593         23,611         41,071   

Other debt securities

                    5,014         6,136   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 171,337       $ 173,383       $ 236,605       $ 258,441   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Securities Held to Maturity:

           

Obligations of states and political subdivisions (1)

   $ 37,048       $ 37,005       $ 36,923       $ 34,330   

Mortgage-backed securities

     5,283         6,089         6,921         7,625   

Other debt securities

     1,000                           
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     43,331       $ 43,094       $ 43,844       $ 41,955   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) The book values of obligations of states and political subdivisions are not calculated on a tax equivalent basis.

The following table presents the fair value of our securities as of June 30, 2016 by their stated maturities (this maturity schedule excludes security prepayment and call features), as well as the weighted average yields for each maturity range.

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

 

    One year or less     More than one year
through five years
    More than five
years through
10 years
    More than
10 years
    Total  
    (Dollars in thousands)  

At June 30, 2016

  Fair
Value
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Fair
Value
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Fair
Value
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Fair
Value
    Weighted
Average
Yield
    Fair
Value
    Weighted
Average
Yield
 

Securities Available for Sale:

                   

U.S. government-sponsored agencies

  $ 2,516        2.7   $          $ 3,100        2.4   $          $ 5,616        2.6

Obligations of states and political subdivisions (1)

                  7,420        1.7        10,177        2.6        198        2.3        17,795        2.2   

Mortgage-backed securities

                  91,966        1.7        25,113        2.2        9,557        3.1        126,636        2.0   

Asset-backed securities

    3,787        3.4        4,672        1.4        9,404        1.4        3,427        1.4        21,290        1.8   
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total

  $ 6,303        3.1   $ 104,058        1.7   $ 47,794        2.2   $ 13,182        2.6   $ 171,337        2.0
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Securities Held to Maturity:

                   

Obligations of states and political subdivisions (1)

  $ 2,137        3.9   $ 17,869        3.4   $ 20,303        3.4   $ 1,314        4.3   $ 41,623        3.5

Mortgage-backed securities

                  5,548        3.1                                    5,548        3.1   

Other debt securities

                                1,000        6.5                      1,000        6.5   
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total

  $ 2,137        3.9   $ 23,417        3.3   $ 21,303        3.6   $ 1,314        4.3   $ 48,171        3.5
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

(1) The fair values of obligations of states and political subdivisions are not calculated on a tax equivalent basis.

 

65


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

At June 30, 2016, we had $4.1 million in federal funds sold, compared with $6.7 million at December 31, 2015. Most of our excess cash balances are held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta or one of our correspondent banks. At June 30, 2016, there were no holdings of securities of any issuer, other than the U.S. government and its agencies, in an amount greater than 10% of our shareholders’ equity.

Loans and Leases

Loans and leases are our largest category of earning assets and typically provide higher yields than other types of earning assets. Associated with the higher loan yields are the inherent credit and liquidity risks that we attempt to control and counterbalance.

The tables below provide a summary of the loan portfolio composition in dollars and percentages as of the periods indicated.

COMPOSITION OF LOAN PORTFOLIO

 

           December 31,  
     June 30, 2016     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Commercial real estate

   $ 275,771      $ 251,197      $ 219,793      $ 182,021      $ 177,147      $ 132,606   

Consumer real estate

     91,091        93,785        77,688        61,545        74,073        54,505   

Construction and land development

     63,744        52,522        46,193        30,217        35,674        24,676   

Commercial and industrial

     389,088        353,442        333,613        319,899        297,281        184,747   

Consumer

     7,486        8,668        7,911        7,939        10,749        12,687   

Other

     61,669        50,197        29,393        26,007        30,333        22,120   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total gross loans

     888,849        809,811        714,591        627,628        625,257        431,341   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unearned income

     (1,412     (1,415     (1,514     (1,246     (929     (1,012
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans net of unearned income

     887,437        808,396        713,077        626,382        624,328        430,329   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for loan and lease losses

     (10,454     (10,132     (11,282     (8,459     (8,214     (6,226
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net loans

   $ 876,983      $ 798,264      $ 701,795      $ 617,923      $ 616,114      $ 424,103   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

COMPOSITION OF LOAN PORTFOLIO

 

           December 31,  
     June 30, 2016     2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  

Commercial real estate

     31.03        31.02     30.76     29.00     28.33     30.74

Consumer real estate

     10.25        11.58        10.87        9.81        11.85        12.64   

Construction and land development

     7.17        6.49        6.46        4.81        5.71        5.72   

Commercial and industrial

     43.77        43.65        46.69        50.97        47.55        42.83   

Consumer

     0.84        1.07        1.11        1.26        1.72        2.94   

Other

     6.94        6.20        4.11        4.14        4.85        5.13   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total gross loans

     100.00     100.00     100.00     100.00     100.00     100.00
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Over the past five years, we have experienced significant growth in our loan portfolio, although the relative composition of our loan portfolio has not changed significantly over that time. Our primary focus has been on commercial and industrial and commercial real estate lending, which constituted 75% of our loan portfolio as of

 

66


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

June 30, 2016. Although we expect continued growth with respect to our loan portfolio, we do not expect any significant changes over the foreseeable future in the composition of our loan portfolio or in our emphasis on commercial lending. Our loan growth since inception has been reflective of the market we serve. A portion of our commercial real estate exposure represents loans to commercial businesses secured by owner-occupied real estate, which, in effect, are commercial loans with the borrowers’ real estate providing a secondary source of repayment. Since 2009, our commercial and industrial and commercial real estate portfolios have continued to experience strong growth, primarily due to implementation of our relationship-based banking model and the success of our relationship managers in transitioning commercial banking relationships from other local financial institutions and in competing for new business from attractive small to mid-sized commercial clients. Many of our larger commercial clients have lengthy relationships with members of our senior management team or our relationship managers that date back to former institutions.

The repayment of loans is a source of additional liquidity for us. The following table details maturities and sensitivity to interest rate changes for our loan portfolio at December 31, 2015:

 

     December 31, 2015  

(Dollars in thousands)

   Due in
1 year or less
     Due in
1-5 years
     Due after
5 years
     Total  

Commercial real estate

   $ 33,668       $ 150,039       $ 67,490       $ 251,197   

Consumer real estate

     7,133         12,968         73,684         93,785   

Construction and land development

     17,668         26,876         7,978         52,522   

Commercial and industrial

     92,095         235,853         25,494         353,442   

Consumer

     7,773         895                8,668   

Other

     29,081         15,616         5,500         50,197   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total gross loans

   $ 187,418       $ 442,247       $ 180,146       $ 809,811   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest rate sensitivity:

           

Fixed interest rates

   $ 73,472       $ 218,453       $ 116,086       $ 408,011   

Floating or adjustable rates

     113,946         223,794         64,060         401,800   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total gross loans

   $ 187,418       $ 442,247       $ 180,146       $ 809,811   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The information presented in the table above is based upon the contractual maturities of the individual loans, which may be subject to renewal at their contractual maturity. Renewal of such loans is subject to review and credit approval, as well as modification of terms at their maturity. Consequently, we believe that this treatment presents fairly the maturity structure of the loan portfolio. Fixed interest rate loans include $71.7 million of variable rate loans that have reached their contractual floor.

Asset Quality

One of our key objectives is to maintain a high level of asset quality in our loan portfolio. We utilize disciplined and thorough underwriting processes that collaboratively engage our seasoned and experienced business bankers, credit underwriters and portfolio managers in the analysis of each loan request. Based upon our aggregate exposure to any given borrower relationship, we employ scaled review of loan originations that may involve senior credit officers, our Chief Credit Officer, our bank’s Credit Committee or, ultimately, our full board of directors. In addition, we have adopted underwriting guidelines to be followed by our lending officers that require senior management review of proposed extensions of credit exceeding certain thresholds. When delinquencies exist, we monitor the levels of such delinquencies for any negative or adverse trends. Our loan review procedures include approval of lending policies and underwriting guidelines by the board of directors of our bank, an independent loan review, approval of larger credit relationships by our bank’s Credit Committee and loan quality documentation procedures. Like other financial institutions, we are subject to the risk that our loan portfolio will be subject to increasing pressures from deteriorating borrower credit due to general economic conditions.

 

67


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

We target small and medium sized businesses, the owners and operators of such businesses and other high net worth individuals as loan clients. Because of their size, these borrowers may be less able to withstand competitive or economic pressures than larger borrowers in periods of economic weakness. If loan losses occur at a level where the allowance for loan and lease losses is not sufficient to cover actual loan losses, our earnings will decrease. We use an independent consulting firm to review our loans for quality in addition to the reviews that may be conducted internally and by bank regulatory agencies as part of their examination process.

Our bank has procedures and processes in place intended to assess whether losses exceed the potential amounts documented in our bank’s impairment analyses and to reduce potential losses in the remaining performing loans within our loan portfolio. These procedures and processes include the following:

 

    we monitor the past due and overdraft reports on a weekly basis to identify deterioration as early as possible and the placement of identified loans on the watch list;

 

    we perform quarterly credit reviews for all watch list/classified loans, including formulation of action plans. When a workout is not achievable, we move to collection/foreclosure proceedings to obtain control of the underlying collateral as rapidly as possible to minimize the deterioration of collateral and/or the loss of its value;

 

    we require updated financial information, global inventory aging and interest carry analysis where appropriate for existing borrowers to help identify potential future loan payment problems; and

 

    we generally limit loans for new construction to established builders and developers that have an established record of turning their inventories, and we restrict our funding of undeveloped lots and land.

Our bank categorizes loans into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as: current financial information, historical payment experience, credit documentation, public information, and current economic trends, among other factors. Our bank analyzes loans individually by classifying each loan as to credit risk. This analysis includes all commercial loans, and consumer relationships with an outstanding balance greater than $500,000, individually. This analysis is performed on a regular basis by the relationship managers and credit department personnel. On at least an annual basis an independent party performs a formal credit risk review of a sample of the loan portfolio. Among other things, this review assesses the appropriateness of the risk rating of each loan in the sample. Our bank uses the following definitions for risk ratings:

 

    Watch. Borrowers with declining earnings, strained cash flow, increasing leverage, and/or weakening fundamentals that indicate above average risk.

 

    Special Mention. A special-mention asset possesses deficiencies or potential weaknesses deserving of management’s attention. If uncorrected, such weaknesses or deficiencies may expose our bank to an increased risk of loss in the future.

 

    Substandard. A substandard asset is inadequately protected by the current sound net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. Assets so classified must have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the distinct possibility that our bank will sustain some loss if deficiencies are not corrected. Loss potential, while existing in the aggregate amount of substandard assets, does not have to exist in individual assets classified substandard.

 

    Doubtful. A doubtful asset has all weaknesses inherent in one classified substandard, with the added characteristic that weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full, on the basis of existing facts, conditions, and values, highly questionable and improbable. The probability of loss is extremely high, but certain important and reasonable specific pending factors which may work to the advantage and strengthening of the asset exist. Therefore, its classification as an estimated loss is deferred until a more exact status may be determined. Pending factors include proposed merger, acquisition or liquidation procedures, capital injection, perfecting liens on additional collateral, and refinancing plans.

 

68


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

Loans not meeting the criteria above are considered to be pass-rated loans. The following tables present the loan balances by category as well as risk rating.

LOAN PORTFOLIO

 

     Performing Loans      Total
Impaired
Loans
     Total  

June 30, 2016

   Pass/
Watch